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Tag Archives: toys

  • 6 Tips to Encourage Independent Play in Babies

    Encourage Independent Play in BabiesAs much as we love our kids, at some point we have to put them down just so we can get some things done. It’s also good for their health and development if they spend some time occupying themselves. After all, you can’t be by their side their entire life. If you think your baby is ready to starting playing independently, here are some tips.

    1. Meet all baby’s needs first. It’s tough to expect a baby to try something new if something is bothering him. Before asking he play by himself, make sure he’s not hungry, thirty, wet or tried. He should be just coming off a nap so his mind is fresh.

    2. Change environments. Your baby can’t complain to be bored like a toddler, but if he’s staring at toys or his play mat uninterested, try switching rooms. If you give him something new to do, he’ll likely start playing again.

    3. Provide open-ended toys. Some toys (like game sets) have very specific ways of playing with them and you can’t really deviate. But toys like blocks, play houses, dress up clothes and art supplies offer endless possibilities and your baby won’t become bored so quickly.

    4. Make sure you are providing attention. You’ll find it hard to get your baby to play independently if he is starved for attention. Make sure you are giving undivided attention several times a day so he always feels it’s available from you.

    5. Stop by often. When your baby is playing independently, stop by every few minutes to jump in on the action. Do this especially when he begins to seem unsettled. Each time you step away, stay away a few minutes longer. This will teach him that solo play time is safe and mom/dad is always near.

    6. Give a quick how-to. Your baby might not be aware that he can play with toys by himself if you’ve always done it with him. Show him how to bang his piano or bounce a ball. This will encourage him to try.

    7. Make toys easily available. We love a tidy, organized home, but it doesn’t do your kids any good if they can’t access their toys. Keep them low and in containers kids can access whenever they want. Will this mean you’ll have rooms strewn with toys? Yes, probably, but it’s good for their development.

    8. Encourage their favorites. If your child shows an interest in a particular toy or topic (like birds or outer space), make sure there are plenty of play options that relate. Your child is likely to play by himself if he’s really interested.

    luxe floor pillowGuest Blog by Cindy Perry, Inventor of the pello, Luxe Floor Pillows

    Cindy, a Texas girl, put herself through college working at a children’s library and sewing at night. When she met her husband and had her two boys, she decided to stay home to care for them while designing window treatments and bedding.

    When Cindy’s first son was learning to sit up, he would always fall through the pillows she set around him, hit his head, and cry. Besides, setting her child down on the hardwood floors on just a blanket always seemed so cold. Using her years of sewing and design skills, Cindy took inspiration from a woman in her breastfeeding class and got to work. With some scrap fabric and a few tweaks, pello was born! pello is a luxefloor pillow that helps children feel safe, warm and protected.

    For more information, visit mypello.com.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 5 Tips to Teach Your Children How to Share

    Teach Your Children How to ShareLearning to share is a normal part of growing up. Kids aren’t built to know how to do this themselves. Parents need to encourage their children to share until the kids start picking it up on their own. This will help turn your children into compassionate, empathetic adults who work well with others. Here are some tips.

    1. Teach taking turns

    If you have two children who want to play with the same item, teach them that they can share by taking turns. You can tell them that they each have 10 minutes to play with the toy and then set a timer. Once the timer goes off it’s the other child’s turn to play with the toy. Not only are they learning how to share, they are also learning patience and delaying gratification. If the children cannot agree to take turns, take the toy away and tell them that neither can play with the toy until they can learn to share.

    2. Set some basic rules

    A young child may not fully understand the concept of sharing right away, but they can follow basic rules that will help them learn how to share. These rules can include teaching them to wait their turn and that if they walk away from a toy, that means it’s free for another child to play with it. Also teach them that if they brings toys along to a play date, everyone gets to play with those toys too.

    3. Donate old toys

    When your children have too many toys in their playroom or get news ones for their birthday or other holidays, donate some to a charity or children’s shelter.  Talk to your child and explain what it means to donate toys and why it’s a good idea to share with the less fortunate. You can even bring your child to a toy store and ask them to pick out items to donate.

    4. Let them see you share.

    Children look to their parents and often emulate their actions and behaviors. Share things with your child, like a cookie or ice cream and ask him to share things with you. If your child is cold, share a blanket with him, and offer the same to other members of your family. Let them know that you would love to share some of your ice cream with them and describe your sharing interactions to them.

    5. Make it fun

    Give your child small toys and rewards to share with some friends. It could be a sheet of stickers or some snacks to be divided evenly with each of his friends. Give your child positive reinforcement by saying how nice it is of him to share with friends and how his friends must feel happy to have a friend who likes to share.

    winter hat, gloves and scarf for babies and toddlersGuest Blog by Christina Plejdrup, Mom and Inventor of the Minkey

    Christina Plejdrup is a mother of a 3-year-old girl, Oliva, who tried many different winter products to see if she could find anything that could get her daughter to keep her gloves on as well as her hat and scarf. Christina tried everything, but nothing worked!

    After several failed attempts to get her daughter to keep her gloves, hat and scar on, Christina designed her own solution! It worked like a charm and when they would walk through their neighborhood, several parents asked where they found such a unique and practical winter garment.  This is when the Minkey (as her daughter calls it) was born.

    The Minkey is a unique 3-in-1 winter hat, gloves and scarf for babies and toddlers. It’s easy to use and goes great under any jacket, snowsuit or vest, and children have plenty of comfort and movement. They will always stay warm and dry where it is important while out in the cold.

    The Minkey is now an award-winning product adored by parents and kids all over the globe!  Visit http://www.theolie.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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