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  • 7 New Mom Tips for Getting Some Sleep

    how new moms can get sleepPinterest paints a rosy picture of new-motherhood, but the truth is that there’s a lot of sleepless nights ahead for new parents. It’s worth it in the end, but that first year is rough. You’ll spend a lot of time worrying about your baby’s sleep habits (and you should – they are important), but don’t forget to think about yourself as well. Here are some ways to for new moms to get some sleep.

    1. Sleep when the baby sleeps – I know you hear this a lot and it seems impossible because there’s always so much to do, but it’s the best piece of advice you’ll hear. The best way to get more sleep is to sleep when you can. When the baby is awake, there is tending to do, but when your little one falls asleep, you must take what you can get.

    2. Say no to extra responsibility – This is not the time in your life to volunteer for field trips, bake cookies for the bake sale, or take on an extra project at work. There will be time for all of that next year, but right now you should trim down your responsibilities.

    3. Accept help – Want to know a secret about super moms who always seem to do so much? They accept the help of other people and delegate tasks. Lean on other people (like your parents) who genuinely want to help. Grandma and Grandpa want to spend time with the baby? Great, how about giving a feeding and a bath too? You will be amazed at how many people will take things off your plate.

    4. You won’t sleep through crying – Some moms worry that they won’t hear their baby cry if they (the mom) are asleep, so they insist that someone be up. That isn’t the case. There’s something in your brain that rockets you awake when your baby cries.

    5. Don’t expect your baby to sleep through the night – An infant who wakes up every two hours is completely normal. Babies wake often to feed. Their little tummies run empty fast! Don’t become frustrated when your baby doesn’t sleep for hours. When he/she does fall asleep, put baby down and get some rest yourself.

    6. Take turns with your spouse – A full, uninterrupted night sleep is a wonderful thing. If one person is getting all the sleep, however, you’ll begin to resent each other. To make sure both people get some sleep, take turns getting up.

    7. Turn away guests – During the first couple months, lots of people will ask to stop over and see the new baby. Unfortunately, this is when families are just getting adjusted to the new little one and sleep is at a premium. Don’t feel guilty about turning people away until things settle and your family finds a routine.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 11 Facts About Newborn Sleep You Have to Know

    newborn sleep factsNewborns (and all children, really) sleep differently than you or I. As a parent, you’ll spend the first months of your child’s life obsessing over their sleep habits. You’ll find one trick that works for a while and then something will change and you’ll have to find something new. Here are some facts about newborn sleep you may not know.

    1. A bedtime routine is one of the best ways to help your child fall asleep, even for newborns. A good routine for a newborn involve lots of sensation, like a bath, gentle rocking, and close contact with mom or dad.

    2. Newborns lack a circadian rhythm. This means they don’t have the mental and behavioral cues to get sleepy when it’s dark. They develop these over time.

    3. The phrase “sleeping like a baby” describes long, deep, peaceful sleep… unlike any newborn I’ve ever seen. Infants wake up often, but that’s part of their design. They need to eat and be comforted.

    4. Babies have significantly shorter sleep cycles than adults, meaning they move into a light sleep mode more often, which gives them opportunities to wake up.

    5. Babies take longer to fall into deep sleep. You can identify deep sleep by their eyelids: if her eyeballs are still, they have entered the deepest part of their cycle.

    6. Sleep is key for brain development. During sleep, blood flow to the brain increases and proteins that make nerves are produced.

    7. You probably don’t have a bad sleeper. Many parents hear stories of that three month-old who sleeps through the night. Even if these are true, they are the exceptions, not the rule.

    8. Babies sleep more than it seems. You may be exhausted, but newborns sleep 16 to 20 hours a day.

    9. Night wakings are actually important. As much as you want your infant to sleep six hours, that wouldn’t be healthy. Young babies have tiny stomachs that burn through food quickly, so they have to wake up to refill their bellies. He/she also needs to sleep lightly as a survival tool so they can quickly respond to any adverse stimuli.

    10. Sleep begets sleep. For you and me, staying up a long time will make us sleep a long time, but that isn’t the case for babies, especially newborns. A rested child has an easier time falling asleep.

    11. Constant pressure is comforting and reassuring to your little one. Whether it’s a swaddle, your arms, or the Slumber Sleeper Bassinet, children are almost universally comforted by constant sensation on their skin. This comes from their experience in the womb. Helping recreate a sense of that environment will go a long way in allowing your child a more restful sleep.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professional, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • The 6 Essential Summertime Sleep Tips

    Summertime Sleep TipsThe summertime poses some interesting sleep challenges for parents, especially for parents of infant children. Many children don’t get adequate sleep during the summer, which can impact their mood and development. Here are some summertime sleep tips to help you get through.

    1. Remove unnecessary bedding – If your child is still in the SIDS risk age, you shouldn’t have any bedding. For older children who might have blankets or pillows, take them out of the crib or off the bed so they don’t keep your child too warm.

    2. Make the space as quiet as possible – Depending on where you live, there might be more ambient noise during sleep times during the summer. Kids play outside later, people have parties and barbeques, cars are driving more often, etc. A white noise machine (or a running fan or air conditioner) is a great way to muffle those sounds.

    3. Hang some blackout curtains – Like adults, babies like to sleep in the dark. During the summer, however, the sun is up longer than usual. It can be tough to convince a baby to fall asleep before it’s dark, or keep them in bed until a reasonable hour. Pull the blackout curtains closed during your bedtime routine so your little one begins to adjust to the night time and leave them closed until it’s time to come out of the crib.

    4. Keep baby’s room cool – Young children sleep the best (and the safest since overheating is a factor of SIDS) in a room that’s between 65 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit. If you don’t have air conditioning, use a fan to keep the air moving and make sure blinds and curtains stay closed during the day so the run doesn’t heat the space.

    5. Use summer clothes – Your little one may look cute in footed pajamas, but they aren’t right for the season. Dress your little one in lightweight pajamas for sleeping. Choose natural fibers, like cotton, which are breathable. Consider what you sleep in: your baby doesn’t need much more.

    6. Don’t neglect the naps – We typically do a lot more during the summer, so it can be easy to go-go-go all day and forget to make time for naps. Even if you spend the day at the zoo or the pool, you need to break for nap time. A tired child falls asleep easily, but an overtired child will fight and resist sleep. Do your best to give a nap, even if it’s sitting in the car (with the AC running!) or stroller.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 7 Sleep Tips for Parents with Newborns

    Sleep Tips for Parents with NewbornsFor most people, getting a newborn to sleep isn’t that hard. Their bodies are exhausted from all growing that they’re usually inclined to fall asleep after each feeding. It’s not always that simple, though. Sometimes you have to work to get a newborn to sleep. You’ve met their needs (they’re clean, dry, and fed), so how does one convince an infant to sleep?

    1. Skin-to-skin – Sometimes babies are just lonely and want to feel that physical connection to mom and dad. Strip your baby to just the diaper and lay him or her against your bare chest.  Your baby will enjoy the warm sensation and eventually quiet down. Wrap yourself in a blanket or a shirt for skin-to-skin contact.

    2. Swaddling – Swaddling prevents the falling-like sensation of the startle reflex and takes your baby back to a comforting and secure place – the womb. Our Slumber Swaddle and Slumber Sleeper are designed to create a safe and comforting sleep environment.

    3. Fill that tummy – Just like you and I, babies love that full tummy feeling. It helps them fall asleep without a care in the world and prevents them from waking up a moment later. Even though their little stomachs need to be constantly replenished, a feeding just before sleep gives you both as much peace and quiet as possible. If you’re clever, it’s possible to feed a baby without waking them up (because the sucking motion is so instinctual).

    4. White noise – White noise is wonderfully simple. When your baby was in the womb, he or she heard noises from inside and outside mom all the time. Noise is comforting. You can pick up a fancy white noise machine if you like, but anything that makes constant noise will do: a fan, an air conditioner, a radio at low volume, etc.

    5. Bedtime routine – A bedtime routine won’t help you on day one, maybe even during the first month, but over time it will be enormously effective. It creates a predictable cue that sleep is coming. Eventually at the beginning of the routine, your baby will start to become drowsy. You can even perform bedtime routines before naps, but they’re usually shorter (for example, no bath).

    6. Diaper changes – You’ll find that a diaper change makes your baby more alert. They’re not in mom or dad’s arms, their body is exposed and their limbs are being manipulated. When your baby wakes up at night and inevitably needs a change, do it before the feeding so your baby can fall asleep with the bottle (and even through the burp).

    7. Stay in baby’s room – If there’s no comfortable place to sit in baby’s room, you might be tempted to let him or her fall asleep on your lap in the living room, or you might take a stroll around your house. It’s best to let baby fall asleep in their room so they become accustomed to it.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 7 Tips to Maintain Healthy Sleep While on Vacation

    Maintain Healthy Sleep While on VacationIt’s vacation season, so many of you may be packing up for a week or two away from home. When you have little kids with you, it’s important to continue to make sure they get proper rest, especially when you’re away and everyone is excited. Here are some tips to help you be sure everyone gets their sleep on vacation.

    1. Your baby still needs naps

    Just because you’re out of the house doesn’t mean naps stop. You may have to make special arrangements so you can be a dark and quiet place during nap time, but that’s just how it goes. If you’re visiting attractions of theme parks, head back to the hotel for a bit.

    2. Bring the big stroller

    You might be tempted to use one of those tiny umbrella strollers when you’re out because they are so light, but these are poor places for your baby to sleep if he or she gets tired. Bring the big stroller so he/she can recline and get cover from the sun.

    3. Take turns nap-sitting

    It can be a drag to spend two or three (or four or five for infants) hours every day waiting for your child to take a nap. Take turns with your spouse so only one of you has to wait around at a time.

    4. Maintain your routine

    If 8 PM is bedtime, keep it that way. Your child is much more likely to get healthy sleep if the schedule stays the same. It might affect your vacation plans, but that’s life as a parent. Keep everything else the same: bottles, baths, pajamas, etc.

    5. Practice!

    If you’re using a travel bed or crib for your trip, have your baby sleep in it a few times before you leave home. This will make it familiar so there isn’t any anxiety in the hotel room.

    6. Bring a familiar lovey

    It’s healthy for your child (at a young age) to have a transitional object to help them self-soothe at night. Make sure you bring this along. If your child doesn’t have one, consider implementing one before you go away.

    7. No sleep training

    Being away from home is NOT the time to work on your sleep training program. Hopefully you know you’ll be traveling in advance so you don’t get interrupted by the trip. When you’re asking your baby to sleep in a new environment, help them soothe however you can and manage the sleep training when you get home.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 7 Reasons Children Wake Up at Night

    Reasons Children Wake Up at NightIt’s a myth that anyone sleeps through the night. We all wake up at one point or another, perhaps to use the bathroom or change positions. In fact, we wake up all the time between our sleep cycles but never truly reach awareness enough to remember it.

    Most children are capable of sustained sleep (six to eight hours) by six months old (that isn’t a hard number, every child is different –it’s just an estimate). By a year, most kids should be sleeping entirely through the night. Some children, however, develop a habit of waking up during the night long after they should stop.

    Here are some reasons your children wake up at night and how you can help.

    1. Fears or separation anxiety – Children who experience anxiety when left alone or away from their parents are more prone to night wakings. It’s important for mom and dad to tackle these fears with the child, rather than ignore them (which can exacerbate the problem).

    2. Nightmares or night terrors – Frightening dreams happen during REM sleep. When we wake up soon after experiencing a dream, we are likely to remember it. If your child wake after having a nightmare, it will trigger anxiety and stress, and he’ll call for mom or dad.

    3. Learned hunger – Some children become accustomed to feeding during the night so they come to expect it. Their bodies wake up hungry and they seek out breast milk, formula, or if they’re old enough, a solid snack. Make sure he or she has a full belly before going to sleep and help your child learn that calorie consumption happens during the daytime..

    4. Poor sleep environment – Children prefer the same types of sleep environments that we do: quiet and dark. Is a TV running? Is there too much noise down the hall? Does your child share the room with someone who doesn’t go to bed at the same time? Any of these can wake your child up. Good white noise sound conditioners can work wonders.

    5. Changing sleep associations - If your child is used to falling asleep in a particular manner (perhaps you rub her back, or she uses a pacifier, or she falls asleep in your bed), she might have a hard time falling back to sleep when she wakes up in a different manner. You can fix this by teaching your child to fall asleep on her own in the place you expect her to sleep and sticking to those conditions.

    6. Medical disorders – It’s quite possible that a medical condition is keeping your child awake at night. If you notice him coughing himself awake, it could be asthma. If he has belly pain or vomiting, it could be acid reflux. Obstructive sleep apnea is also a possibly in children. Consult your doctor if you suspect any of these issues.

    7. Overtiredness – When we allow ourselves to become overtired, we experience restless sleep which is more likely to wake us up in between sleep cycles. Children do not have the ability to settle themselves well, so they struggle to soothe themselves back to sleep. The only cure is more sleep, which is understandably hard.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • How to Make the Transition to One Nap a Day

    Transition to One Nap a DayMany people think the “terrible twos” are a symptom of a poor sleep schedule rather than an unavoidable developmental problem. A toddler’s body and brain want to stay up and explore the world, but they still need their sleep. If they drop naps too quickly, you end up with a perpetually cranky child. This might explain the “trying threes” and “fearsome fours” as well!

    Always remember that a well-rested child is a happy child. It’s easier to put a baby down to sleep when she gets regular, healthy sleep. Keeping her awake doesn’t make her sleep longer at night. By the end of the first year, you’ve likely mastered the two-naps-per-day routine, but your toddler is starting to protest. Here’s how to transition to one nap.

    Don’t rush them out of the two-nap phase

    The nap schedule shouldn’t be about what mom or dad wants or thinks is right, but should be dictated by the child’s biology. Naps at different times serve different purposes. Morning naps help REM (dreaming) sleep, which is important for early brain development. You don’t want to force your child to give up this type of sleep if their body still needs it.

    Your child still needs two naps if…

    • He is under a year old.
    • You put him down and even though he fusses, he still sleeps for more than hour.
    • He easily falls asleep in the car seat or stroller.
    • He is dealing with a life change (sickness, new sibling, new daycare, etc.).
    • He is fussy until bedtime if he misses a nap.
    • Look for the signs
    • Your child’s behavior will let you know that it’s time to adjust the nap schedule. She will behave in one or several of these ways:
    • She’ll play through the morning nap and fall asleep a little sooner for the afternoon nap.
    • She’ll fall asleep later for the morning nap and then play through the afternoon nap.
    • She’ll get cranky and irritated if you put her down when she isn’t tired.
    • She’ll miss a nap accidentally (maybe you’re shopping or something exciting happened), but stays calm through the day and goes to bed easily.

    You have several options

    Before eliminating a nap, consider some other options. You can fiddle with the sleep schedule a bit to find one that works for your child. For example, try keeping two separate sleep times but shortening the duration of both. This can help you through the “two-naps-is-too-much-but-one-nap-isn’t-enough” phase. Just make sure every nap is at least forty-five minutes so a sleep cycle is completed.

    Never try “cold turkey”

    You won’t have a two-nap child one day and a one-nap child the next. Biological changes are gradual and slow-acting. Even if your child has one-napped every day this week, look out for signs of sleepiness and offer a second nap if necessary. You could also spend what would be second nap time doing something still and quiet, like reading books in bed. If your child falls asleep, so be it. Another idea is to move bedtime earlier during the first one-nap days.

    Prepare your day care provider

    Make sure to be open with the day care provider about the changes in schedules. Larger schools often have different classes (or rooms) based on how the children are sleeping. If your child is one-napping at home but still two-napping at school, the schedule may be hectic to manage.

    luxe floor pillowGuest Blog by Cindy Perry, Inventor of the pello, Luxe Floor Pillows

    Cindy, a Texas girl, put herself through college working at a children’s library and sewing at night. When she met her husband and had her two boys, she decided to stay home to care for them while designing window treatments and bedding.

    When Cindy’s first son was learning to sit up, he would always fall through the pillows she set around him, hit his head, and cry. Besides, setting her child down on the hardwood floors on just a blanket always seemed so cold. Using her years of sewing and design skills, Cindy took inspiration from a woman in her breastfeeding class and got to work. With some scrap fabric and a few tweaks, pello was born! pello is a luxefloor pillow that helps children feel safe, warm and protected.

    For more information, visit mypello.com.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 13 Simple Baby Sleep Solutions

    Simple Baby Sleep SolutionsIf you’re struggling to help your child fall asleep, you aren’t alone. Helping your baby fall asleep is one of the first challenges you’ll face as a new parent. It will take some time to figure out what works for your family, but use this list of simple sleep solutions to get started.

    1. Avoid eye contact – Prolonged eye contact is stimulating for your baby. When you’re trying to help her sleep, avoid gazing into her eyes.

    2. Bath time – A soothing soak is a great way to relax your baby, but don’t include squirt toys or splashing. Keep your voice low and easy.

    3. Hands-on after transfer – When you transfer baby to the crib from your arms, leave your warm hands on her stomach for a few seconds so she feels safe.

    4. Swaddling – A nicely wrapped swaddle takes your baby back to days in the womb. Use a swaddle or our Slumber Sleeper to keep baby safe, secure and warm.

    5. Sleep begets sleep – An overtired baby is a challenge to get to sleep. The more often she sleeps, the easier it will be to get her to sleep. Keep your nap schedule!

    6. White noise – In the womb, baby heard a lot of sound from within and outside of mom. Gentle, white noise is comforting.

    7. Dark room – Light is stimulating and it blocks melatonin production. Skip nightlights and use blackout curtains to keep the room dark or if you want a nightlight use orange light or salt lamp.

    8. Co-sleeping – Co-sleeping means having your baby sleep in the same room as mom and dad, NOT sleeping in the same bed (which is dangerous).

    9. Stay cool – Babies sleep best in rooms kept between 65 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit. (It’s also helpful in preventing SIDS.)

    10. Offer pacifier – A pacifier at bedtime can help soothe your baby. When she falls asleep, remove it so she doesn’t wake up when it falls out naturally.

    11. Rocking/walking – We all know that rocking a baby helps them fall asleep, but it’s the walking gesture that works for the best for some. Your baby is used to the rolling, side-to-side motion from months in mom’s stomach. If rocking back and forth isn’t helping, take a walk around your home.

    12. Learn the tired cues – After a few weeks with your baby, you’ll start to recognize the signs of tiredness. Do not ignore them, even if you’re out of the house. Find a way to help your baby sleep or risk a meltdown.

    13. Tell you baby you love them with a smile allowing them to know that sleep time is positive.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

    Image: tungphoto/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

  • How Much Sleep do Babies and Kids Need?

    To support their rapid development (mentally, emotionally and physically), babies and children need a tremendous amount of sleep. Not only does sleep rejuvenate them and collect energy, but it’s the time when a majority of the growing takes place. Even missing an hour of sleep in a day can impact their personality, cognitive functions, and overall development.

    Many parents know their kids require more sleep, but not by how much. Often it’s hard to tell if our children need more sleep, or require some other need to be met. The signs of insufficient sleep aren’t always the same for small children, especially babies. In fact, sleep deprivation in babies can appear as restlessness and hyperactivity. When they’re overtired, they resist any attempts to help, including bedtime.

    The following are some simple guidelines to tell you how much sleep a child needs. Keep in mind that these are guidelines and your child might deviate slightly. If you notice significant difference between your child’s sleep schedule and this list, consult your pediatrician.


    Image and information credit: National Sleep Foundation

    • Newborns (0 to 3 months) need 14 to 17 hours of sleep each day, with no less than 11 or more than 19.
    • Infants (4 to 11 months) need 12 to 15 hours of sleep each day, with no less than 10 or more than 18.
    • Toddlers (1 to 2 years) need 11 to 14 hours of sleep each day, with no less than 9 or more than 16.
    • Preschoolers (3 to 5 years) need 10 to 13 hours of sleep each, with no less than 8 or more than 14.
    • Kids (6 to 13 years) need 9 to 11 hours of sleep each day, with no less than 7 or more than 12.
    • Teenagers (14 to 17 years) need 8 to 10 hours of sleep each day, with no less than 7 or more than 11.
    • Young adults (18 to 25) need 7 to 9 hours of sleep each day, with no less than 6 or more than 11.

    If you suspect your child isn’t getting adequate sleep and you’ve done everything you can to help them, talk to your doctor. Long term sleep deprivation isn’t healthy for anyone, but especially not for children who are struggling to grow.

    Your doctor may be able to teach your some helpful techniques or recognize an underlying medical condition (like sleep apnea, which we’re learning is more common in young children than we thought). Often sleep struggles can be resolved by changing the sleep environment and bedtime habits.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 13 Safe Sleep Tips for Infants and Toddlers

    Safe Sleep Tips for Infants and ToddlersSafe sleep is of the utmost importance to parents of babies and toddlers. There are many concerns surrounding safe sleeping environments and practices for children today and it’s up to parents to do their research and learn what they should and shouldn’t be doing for their children. Swanling Innovations is committed to providing modern, safe and innovative products for children and providing safe sleep solutions for parents. Here are our top safe sleep tips for infants and toddlers.

    1. Back is Best

    Always place baby on his or her back for sleep – for nighttime sleep AND nap time sleep. The back sleeping position reduces the risk of SIDS.

    2. Swaddling

    Pediatricians recommend swaddling baby for sleep time during the first three months. Babies have the Moro or startle reflex until approximately 3 months of age, which causes them to flail their arms and legs and wake themselves up. Swaddling helps reduce awakenings caused by the startle reflex. Babies sleep better when swaddled and on their backs. The Slumber Swaddle™ with the original Snap-In-Place™ system is the perfect accessory to the Slumber Sleeper™ for newborns and it takes the guesswork out of swaddling! Just snap, wrap and tie. Even though your child may have grown out of swaddling they will be able to continue to feel that wonderful feeling of being held and secure while still using their Slumber Sleeper™, and arms-free sleep sac that uses the same Snap-In-Place™ system.

    3. Temperature Awareness

    Most medical experts recommend a sleep environment of 65-72°F (18-22°C). It is important to dress your baby appropriately for sleep.

    As a general guide, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends dressing baby in no more than one layer more than an adult would use to be comfortable in the same environment. Babies are not good at regulating their own temperatures. No blanket can naturally regulate baby's temperature for them, so parents need to touch and feel their baby to ensure baby is not too hot or too cold. Your baby’s tummy is an excellent representation of their core temperature.

    4. Firm Sleep Surface

    Baby should sleep on a firm sleep surface, in a bassinet, cradle or crib near the mother's bed, without any soft toys, pillows or loose bedding. The Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends a fitted sheet on the baby's mattress. Babies should not be placed for sleep on water beds, quilts, pillows, sheepskins, or other fluffy surfaces.

    5. No Soft Objects

    No soft objects or loose bedding should be in baby's bed during sleep time. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no stuffed animals, no sheepskin, no quilts, no positioners, no pillows, and no bumpers should be in your child’s crib while they are sleeping.

    6. Keep all cords away from crib

    Electrical cords from video monitors, cameras and window treatments should be kept a minimum of three (3) feet away from baby’s crib and secured completely out of child’s reach. Cords are a strangulation hazard.

    7. Smoke Free Environment

    Always keep baby's environment smoke-free by not smoking when pregnant, near your baby, or in an area where your baby spends time or sleeps. Maternal smoking during pregnancy has emerged as a major risk factor in almost every epidemiologic study of SIDS.

    8. Ventilation

    Be sure that air can circulate freely around baby's face. A small fan in baby's room can increase ventilation, but should not blow air directly on baby.

    9. Breastfeeding

    Breastfeeding is encouraged. Breastfeed, if you can. Research shows that any amount of breastfeeding reduces the risk of SIDS along with the many proven physical and emotional benefits breastfeeding offers.

    10. Tummy Time

    Allow time for tummy time when baby is awake and supervised. Place baby on tummy during play time. Please remember that baby should ALWAYS be placed to sleep on his back.

    11. Colic

    Colic is believed to occur when a baby is sensitive to the environment surrounding them-which can cause baby to be very unsettled, or when gas forms in the belly causing discomfort.

    12. White Noise

    Soothing white noise can help your baby sleep more restfully and lessen noise interference that may stir or wake baby causing interrupted sleeping habits.

    13. Wish your child sweet dreams and a restful sleep :)

    The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in-1 safe sleep solution that has longevity unlike most baby products. It’s designed for newborn babies (7lbs) used in conjunction with the Slumber Swaddle and goes up to 2 years and also comes in a twin size for toddlers up to 4 years.  The Slumber Sleeper™ combines a mattress protector, fitted sheet, flat sheet, and a sleep sack all in one to help baby fall asleep and sleep safely throughout the night. The unique design of the Slumber Sleeper™ is intended to keep baby feeling safe, warm, and centered in bed giving them the benefits of long-term sleep training.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • Three Ways to Teach Baby to Self-Soothe

    teach baby to self-sootheIt’s no secret – keeping a baby happy and comfortable at all times is not always easy and the only way a baby lets us know something is wrong is by crying. Babies will cry for various reasons, but figuring out exactly what that reason may be is the difficult part. When the crying starts, you will need to know how to soothe your child as best as you can, but it’s also important to allow your baby to learn self-soothing skills. Here are three ways you can teach your baby to self-soothe.

    1. Create a Soothing Routine

    While you may not be able to directly teach your child to soothe itself at first, you can set the proper environment to allow them to learn as they go. This all starts with a habitual bedtime routine or as what child sleep consultants like to call a “soothing routine.” With a routine, your child will become accustomed to it as they begin to grow and develop.

    An important factor in creating a soothing routine is to choose a single bedtime each night to set your baby’s internal clock which they will get used to.  Also, the preparation for bed should include a couple consistent activities as well, which can include things like taking a warm bath, dimming the lights, and cuddling a little.

    As you begin to go through the bedtime soothing routine, baby’s body will begin to respond and become drowsy. If you’re consistent, you’ll find your child start to fall asleep as you begin.

    2. Drift Away

    While your child may not be able to fall asleep at night without the comfort of your arms around them, you need to keep your main goal in mind:  teaching your child to self-soothe. However, with the help and soothing properties of the Slumber Sleeper, your child gets the advantage of feeling like they are being held while at the same time learning to sleep independently. Children need to know that you aren’t going to be able to stay right by their side at all hours of the night and by giving them the soothing comfort of the Slumber Sleeper, they do fall asleep quicker and sleep for longer periods of time. Parents no longer need to play the distance game to help with separation as the child goes to bed already feeling secure and held. Children happily fall asleep on their own paving the way to a healthier and more independent sleep training.

    Wherever possible, avoid letting your child fall asleep in your arms. Look for “sleepy cues” to know when baby is tired in order to place him or her in the crib to fall asleep alone. You do not want to wait until baby is overtired.  Some sleepy cues are:

    • rubbing eyes,
    • slight quieting,
    • rooting or wanting to nurse,
    • asking for a bottle, pacifier or lovey,
    • gazing off,
    • decreased activity,
    • sucking is weaker or slower,
    • quieter,
    • disinterested in surroundings,
    • eyes less focused,
    • yawning,
    • less movement of arms and legs,
    • droopy eyelids,
    • thumb sucking, and
    • pulling ears.

    If baby cries after you place them in the crib, use shushing sounds to soothe baby and leave the room to help them learn to self-soothe. The Baby Sleep Whisperer displays this well in this video helping baby sleep in her own crib. This will prevent your child from becoming conditioned to fall asleep only in your arms.

    3. Swaddle and Then Wean from the Swaddle

    Swaddling in the “hands over heart” position is the natural position baby is used to while in the womb. In this position, baby can use their hands and fingers to self-sooth and settle themselves down. Further, the fetal tuck position is soothing to the child as its is the natural position of infants and helps your baby to thrive and grow strong. The Slumber Swaddle is one of the few swaddle blankets on the market that not only offers the hands to heart placement, but it further allows self soothing or finger sucking if needed. Being able to use a swaddle blanket that gives your child these soothing qualities is not only fundamental but it gives parents peace of mind and sleep as well.

    When baby begins to roll, it’s no longer safe to swaddle. Some parents dread the transition, but weaning baby from swaddling is a big part of self-soothing since baby is able to move freely, interact with their surroundings, and have their hands free to move around. To help baby transition out of swaddling, use the Slumber Sleeper™ sleep system to continue to provide safety, security and comfort for baby, further it allows for arms-free, safe sleep for children.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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