Call Us! 855.777.4338

Helping Children (and Families)
to Have a Better Night's Sleep

Tag Archives: sleep schedule

  • 4 Ways to Make an Easy Daylight Savings Time Change for Your Family

    daylight savings time sleep tips for babies and kidsEvery parent understands the importance of a schedule. Our bodies thrive on consistency and that goes double for little kids. When they go to bed and nap at consistent times, they have energy and great moods. But when their schedules are erratic and unpredictable, they’re somber and cranky. Plus, sleep deprivation can affect a child’s development.

    That’s what makes Daylight Savings Time so hard for a lot of parents. The “falling back” part in autumn is easy because everyone gets more sleep, but the “spring ahead” can be difficult.

    Fortunately, the time change doesn’t have to be a nightmare with a little preparation. Here are some essential tips to help your family adjust to Daylight Savings Time.

    1. Start adjusting early

    Daylight Savings Time starts on March 13th this year. It’s a Sunday, which is nice because it gives us at least one buffer day before we have places to be on Monday.

    Start your adjustment early – at least four days in advance. The goal is make the first day of DST as painless as possible by adjusting each previous day just a little bit.

    Each day, put your kids to bed 15 minutes earlier than the day before. You might have to adjust other daily activities to help their bodies adjust, like meal times, nap times, and snack times. Then, wake them up 15 minutes earlier in the morning. If you do this four days before DST starts, they’ll have adjusted for the hour without any hassle.

    2. Keep the rest of your routine the same

    During the adjustment period, don’t mess with any other parts of their routine. This is not the time to transition from two-nap-days to one-nap-days. It’s not the time to take a long car trip to visit Grandma. And it’s not the time to start new things, like dance or soccer. Focus on keeping everything the same until the adjustment has been made. It’s only four days, so this shouldn’t interrupt your life too much.

    3. Use lighting

    Our bodies use melatonin to regulate our internal clock. When it gets dark, our bodies increase our melatonin levels, which makes us sleepy. When it’s bright, melatonin is actually broken down by the light.

    You can induce sleepiness and wakefulness by adjusting the amount of light in your home. Close the curtains and dim the lights about 45 minutes before bedtime to put your child in the mood to sleep. Open the curtains and turn on lights as it gets near wake time.

    This is an excellent way to gradually wake up or put your child to sleep, without fussiness or tears.

    4. Be patient

    If you can, I recommend making the few days after the DST low activity. If you have to get the kids out of the house in the morning, this might be tough for you, but if your kids spend the day at home, don’t force them to stick to a schedule. Their bodies will naturally adjust on their own, even if you don’t intervene.

    I hope that helps! Daylight Savings Time usually isn’t a problem for most parents, but for some families it can be a tense few days. We’d love to hear about your DST challenges. Post your questions or comments on Facebook and we’ll help you out!

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professional, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • Tips for Relieving Baby’s Stuffy Nose

    Relieving Baby’s Stuffy NoseInfants primarily breathe through their nose. When their nose and sinuses block up, babies become particularly irritated. You’ll first notice the snorting and head ticking, then the fussiness, and eventually crying. This is usually do to nasal inflammation or overproduction of mucus, which indicates a cold virus or sinus infection. A stopped-up nose can challenge your baby’s breathing and disrupt his appetite, so use these tips to help your baby breathe better.

    Extract those boogers

    Using a tool like oogiebear, gently extract the mucus from within your baby’s nose. Use the loop end of the device to pull out the sticky and slimy mucus and the scoop end for dried and crusty mucus. It removes mucus effectively and so your child breathes easier. Some children find this chore scary, so be sure to stay positive and playful.

    Insert some saline solution

    Infant saline solution will help thin out mucus so it drains from the nose naturally. You can buy this at the pharmacy or create your own out of ½ cup of warm water and a ¼ teaspoon of salt. Tilt baby’s head back and drop two or three drops into the nostrils. Hold the head back for about a minute so it has time to soak into the mucus (instead of running right out).

    You could also try a neti pot, which is a small container with a narrow spot for pouring small amounts of saline into the nostrils.

    Spend time in a steamy room

    Breathing steamy air can transfer that moisture into sinus cavities, draining the fluid and causing the lining of the nasal passage to constrict. Run your shower as hot as you can for a few minutes with the bathroom door closed, then sit inside with your baby so he can breathe in the wet air. Play with some toys so he isn’t frightened by the odd atmosphere.

    Elevate the head

    A common and simple way to get stuffy head relief is to keep the head elevated so the sinus drain. Roll a few towels and place them beneath your baby’s mattress on the side he lays his head to keep him at an angle all night.

    Avoid over the counter treatments

    The active ingredients in many medications and decongestants aren’t suitable for children under the age of four. Also, some decongestants can actually cause the symptoms they work to reduce if you overuse them. If you feel your child’s condition warrants medication, always consult your doctor first.

    Maintain the sleep schedule

    There isn’t much you can do to treat a stuffy head or cold other than manage the symptoms and wait it out. Encourage your baby to sleep through the discomfort as much as possible. Even if your child is fussy, go through your usual bedtime routine and put your baby down to sleep as you normally would.

    booger removal toolGuest Blog by Dr. Nina Farzin, Inventor of oogiebear

    Nina is a wife, mother and career professional who never intended to start her own business. When her children were newborns, she ached to ease the discomfort from dry, stubborn, crusty mucus (boogers)! As a doctor, she knew there were no safe solutions on the market to help her kids, so she invented oogiebear, a revolutionary booger removal tool that helps babies breathe easier.

    Nina graduated Howard University where she earned her doctorate in Pharmacy (R.Ph, Pharm.D). She is a Registered Pharmacist in Washington DC, Maryland and New York. Nina and her family are fitness enthusiasts who enjoy outdoor activities and healthy eating.

    For more information, please visit myoogie.com.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 4 Reasons Your Baby Isn’t Sleeping Well

    Reasons Your Baby Isn’t Sleeping WellSleep is a complex process. It takes time and a lot of your patience for your baby to learn how to sleep properly. Don’t fret if you notice that your baby isn’t sleeping well, just arm yourself with knowledge and guide her through it. Here are four reasons your baby might not be sleeping well.

    1. Baby needs you to fall asleep

    You’ve probably heard that it’s important to put baby down to sleep “drowsy but awake.” This is great advice during the first four months. By putting your baby down drowsy, she learns to fall asleep by herself. This starts the learning process of self-soothing.

    By four months, however, you shouldn’t be putting her down drowsy; you should be laying her down wide awake so she learns how to go from wide awake to fast asleep alone. Drowsiness is the beginnings of sleep. If you let her fall asleep in your arms, she’ll begin to need it.

    2. Baby is fed too close to sleep time

    In the beginning, it’s inevitable that your baby will fall asleep feeding at some point. Feeding is a soothing, relaxing experience that your baby enjoys, so it’s no wonder that is lulls her to sleep. As she gets older however, you want to separate the feedings from sleep time. This can cause a sleep-feeding association. When your baby wakes up in the night, she will immediately want to feed just to get back to sleep, which requires her to call to you rather than soothe herself back to sleep.

    Some people like to “top off baby’s tank” before sleep in hopes that baby will sleep longer, but that isn’t advisable past four months. Try moving your final feeding of the day to the very beginning of the bedtime routine so there’s still some time and activity before sleep comes.

    3. Baby’s sleep schedule isn’t suitable for her age

    Sleep is a biological function. It will change and adjust as your child grows like everything else. Your child’s sleep habits need to reflect her age, not some rigid schedule. A well-rested child accepts sleep more easily, which means a child who has healthy sleep during the day will also sleep better at night.

    It seems counterintuitive, but it makes sense when you think about it. If we put ourselves to sleep at the same time every day, it will be become easier to fall asleep at that time. This means that for your baby, daytime sleep is just as important as nighttime sleep, so be sure to respect it.

    4. You’re rushing in too quickly in the night

    Well-intentioned parents can inadvertently sabotage their child’s sleep by rushing into the nursery at the first sound. All babies have an occasional sleep-cry they emit during the night, and it can be quite loud. Don’t mistake this for a cry of pain or loneliness or you’ll end up waking your child up when it wasn’t unnecessary.

    Even if your child does wake up and make some noises, you should still pause a moment. Is baby in distress or is she just making her usual gurgles and chirps? If all of baby’s needs are met, give her a moment to try and put herself back to sleep.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • How to Develop a Sleep Schedule for Baby

    develop a sleep schedule for babyIf you can establish a successful sleep schedule for your child, it can make your life a whole lot easier. Also, a sleep schedule will put your baby on track for a much healthier lifestyle as they grow older. Try to use the following guidelines to get started but the key to developing a sleep schedule is using the techniques that work best for you.

    (Keep in mind that there’s no need to usher your child toward a sleep schedule during the first three months. For health reasons, it’s best to allow your baby to sleep whenever he or she prefers.)

    Start Early

    If possible, try to start a sleep schedule as soon as your child is able to fulfill the guidelines you’re putting in place. Once a consistent bedtime is established, the rest of the day will fall into place a lot easier.

    Establish a Routine

    One of the best ways to signal to your child that it’s almost time to go to sleep is by initiating the established routine you have set for them. Whether this routine includes brushing their teeth, taking a bath, putting on pajamas, reading a story, or other ideas, practicing this habitual schedule will slowly get them ready for bedtime. By the time all the pre-bedtime tasks are completed, your child’s body will know it’s time for the lights to be turned off.

    Night and Day

    When a child is very young, they sometimes get their nights and days mixed up due to all the occasional naps and weird sleep schedules they develop. When it’s daytime, try to keep the house bright and active so there’s no chance of them confusing it for bedtime. Play active games and speak to baby often.

    At night, the house should be dim or dark and there shouldn’t be any noises or loud conversations. Speak soothingly and play quietly. They need to know that night is for sleeping and day is for everything else!

    Make the Sacrifice

    When you’re first starting out on establishing your child’s sleep routine, there may be times when you have to make a sacrifice of staying up very late or waking up very early. Also, try to observe their patterns throughout the first few weeks to see which times of the day and night they’re most active or docile. Once a sleep schedule is in place, make sure that vacations, long events, and outings, etc. don’t make you deviate from it at all. The smallest interference could have a big impact on a young child.

    Expect Changes

    As your baby grows, you’ll have to change and adapt the sleep schedule to meet his changing needs. Baby will need fewer naps and more daytime stimulation, but sleep longer stretches at night. Embrace these changes as a sign that your little one is growing up.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • Creating a Bedtime Routine That Works

    creating a bedtime routineJust like you or I, a child can’t switch from moments of high activity to sleep without some transition. To help them get into sleep mode, you should create a predictable routine that you perform just before bed. The sooner you establish a bedtime routine, the happier (and healthier) your whole family will be. Over time, your child will begin to show signs of drowsiness when you begin the routine.

    The details of the routine will change a bit as your child grows, and routines vary between families, but the basics will remain. Here’s how you can set a bedtime routine.

    Pick a Time

    I’m sure you’ve noticed that if you fall asleep at ten one evening, you’re sleepy the next night at the same time. Children are the same. Their bodies adjust to the schedules they keep. Exploit this so they follow a regular pattern and fall asleep without protest.

    Keep it Routine

    Naturally, the most important part of a bedtime routine is consistency. Once you find one that works, stick to it at all costs. Once you set the path, not only do children conform to it, they eventually prefer it. The bedtime procedure should stay the same all through the week, even on weekends. If your family visits Grandma for the holidays, maintain the routine as best you can at her house.

    Provide a Transitional Object

    Separation from you can be hard on many children. It’s helpful to create a transitional object that stands as a substitute for mom or dad when it’s time to go to sleep. This helps them cope with the anxiety of your absence. This object is often a stuffed animal with a personalized name. The Slumber Swan makes for a perfect transitional object.

    Designate a Sleep Environment

    Create a space that welcomes comfort and sleep. Keep distractions out of this room if possible. Play should happen in another room so your child doesn’t subconsciously associate the bedroom with activity and energy. Most importantly, your child should sleep in this place consistently so he or she becomes used to it.

    Popular Bedtime Routine Steps

    Offer a Light Snack – If meal time was a while back, offer something with carbohydrates and protein. The carbs induce sleepiness and the protein maintains blood sugar until the next meal.

    Give a Warning – At a young age, your child won’t understand “ten minutes to bedtime,” but it helps build an association that the day is winding down. This will give them some time to mentally prepare themselves for the change.

    Play Calmly – After-dinner play shouldn’t involve a lot of movement or activity. Play calmly with toys in a seated position. Keep your voice low and the lights dim.

    Give a Warm Bath – By raising your child’s body temperature slightly, you’ll make him or her more prone to sleep. It’s also a way to play in a calm manner. Since you your child can’t crawl or move around much, they won’t excite themselves. (If your baby doesn’t enjoy baths or gets too excited during them, leave this off your routine.)

    Ritual Grooming – Go through the typical end-of-day tasks that anyone else would: brushing teeth and gums, washing hands and face, change of diaper/use potty, etc.

    Dress for Bed – Choose non-binding, comfortable clothes. Let your child choose so they feel a sense of “ownership” over the process.

    Read a Storybook – Stories are the perfect activity just before bedtime because everyone is still, sitting comfortably in bed, and your voice will lull your child to sleep.

    Say Goodnight Briefly – Say goodnight, tell your child you love him or her and then exit the room. Don’t rush back in at the first noise (unless of course you believe you hear distress).

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 4 Baby Sleep Myths

    baby sleep mythsBaby sleep is a complicated issue. During your first months of parenthood, it could be the single largest obstacle in your life. You may look to your pediatrician for answers, query your friends and family, poke at Google and even hire a certified child sleep consultant. Unfortunately, you’re bound to find some common misinformation. Here are some baby sleep myths you’re sure to come across.

    1. You need to be quiet around a sleeping baby.

    It’s true that babies tend to be lighter sleepers than adults, but there’s no need to whisper in your own home in fear that your child will wake up. When your baby was in the womb, she was exposed to lots of noises and sounds, from the outside world and even inside your body. (Imagine what a hungry tummy sounds like on the inside!).

    Many of these noises are actually soothing to your child at this point. Some babies even resist sleeping in pure silence. You might be tempted to use a white noise machine. These devices are fine, just be careful your child doesn’t become too accustomed to the machine (or to silence). It’s best your child becomes used to typical house noises.

    2. Adding rice cereal to your baby’s bottle will help her sleep longer.

    At some point, someone will suggest this to you and it will seem odd right away. Nevertheless, this myth has persisted. The supposed logic is that your baby won’t wake up and cry out at night because she won’t be hungry. It seems like it could be true, but there’s no evidence to support this claim. Babies who eat rice cereal before bed don’t sleep any longer.

    Furthermore, feeding rice cereal to a baby under four months old isn’t safe. Their gastrointestinal systems haven’t developed enough to process it.

    3. Start sleep training right away.

    Parents would do well to accept their child’s erratic sleep schedule during the early months. It’s easier to adjust our schedules than force to the baby on to a schedule at this point. A circadian rhythm develops over time and takes effect near the third or fourth month. Forcing your baby to stay awake just so she’ll sleep when you prefer can have serious developmental effects.

    4. You must respond to your baby right away at night.

    Well-intentioned parents often rush into the nursery at the slightest whimper over the baby monitor. If your baby makes some sleep noises, or even wakes up a bit and gurgles for a few minutes, don’t charge into the room and slather on the attention. Give your child a few minutes to put herself back to sleep. If you don’t give her the opportunity to learn how to self-soothe, she surely never will.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

6 Item(s)

Questions?   Need Help?