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Tag Archives: sleep environment

  • 7 Reasons Children Wake Up at Night

    Reasons Children Wake Up at NightIt’s a myth that anyone sleeps through the night. We all wake up at one point or another, perhaps to use the bathroom or change positions. In fact, we wake up all the time between our sleep cycles but never truly reach awareness enough to remember it.

    Most children are capable of sustained sleep (six to eight hours) by six months old (that isn’t a hard number, every child is different –it’s just an estimate). By a year, most kids should be sleeping entirely through the night. Some children, however, develop a habit of waking up during the night long after they should stop.

    Here are some reasons your children wake up at night and how you can help.

    1. Fears or separation anxiety – Children who experience anxiety when left alone or away from their parents are more prone to night wakings. It’s important for mom and dad to tackle these fears with the child, rather than ignore them (which can exacerbate the problem).

    2. Nightmares or night terrors – Frightening dreams happen during REM sleep. When we wake up soon after experiencing a dream, we are likely to remember it. If your child wake after having a nightmare, it will trigger anxiety and stress, and he’ll call for mom or dad.

    3. Learned hunger – Some children become accustomed to feeding during the night so they come to expect it. Their bodies wake up hungry and they seek out breast milk, formula, or if they’re old enough, a solid snack. Make sure he or she has a full belly before going to sleep and help your child learn that calorie consumption happens during the daytime..

    4. Poor sleep environment – Children prefer the same types of sleep environments that we do: quiet and dark. Is a TV running? Is there too much noise down the hall? Does your child share the room with someone who doesn’t go to bed at the same time? Any of these can wake your child up. Good white noise sound conditioners can work wonders.

    5. Changing sleep associations - If your child is used to falling asleep in a particular manner (perhaps you rub her back, or she uses a pacifier, or she falls asleep in your bed), she might have a hard time falling back to sleep when she wakes up in a different manner. You can fix this by teaching your child to fall asleep on her own in the place you expect her to sleep and sticking to those conditions.

    6. Medical disorders – It’s quite possible that a medical condition is keeping your child awake at night. If you notice him coughing himself awake, it could be asthma. If he has belly pain or vomiting, it could be acid reflux. Obstructive sleep apnea is also a possibly in children. Consult your doctor if you suspect any of these issues.

    7. Overtiredness – When we allow ourselves to become overtired, we experience restless sleep which is more likely to wake us up in between sleep cycles. Children do not have the ability to settle themselves well, so they struggle to soothe themselves back to sleep. The only cure is more sleep, which is understandably hard.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 6 Daylight Savings Time Sleep Tips for Babies

    Daylight Savings Time Sleep Tips for BabiesA baby’s sleep schedule is a precious thing. We spend a lot of time and energy making sure our children get the sleep they need for healthy development.

    Next week on March 8th we’ll be “springing forward” an hour, which means we lose an hour of sleep. This is the kind of change that disrupt a grown adult’s schedule and it can wreak havoc on a baby’s.

    Here are some tips to cope with the Daylight Savings Time change.

    1. Make naps a priority

    Always remember that sleep begets sleep. A well-rested baby has an easier time going to sleep and adapting to changes. Make sure your baby gets all of her scheduled naps during the day and that you don’t plan too many out-and-about activities that could keep her awake.

    2. Adjust bedtimes over the week

    Starting Tuesday or Wednesday, adjust baby’s bedtime fifteen minutes earlier each day. This will slowly acclimate her body to the new bedtime. By Sunday, she won’t even notice the difference. (This is a great piece of advice for adults who struggle with the change, too!) Don’t try to wear your child out so she falls asleep early, however. An overtired child doesn’t get rest.

    3. Start Daylight Savings on Saturday

    Losing an hour of sleep Sunday morning only gives us a day to recover. You can smooth out your week by hosting Daylight Savings on Saturday so your kids have two full days to recuperate and adjust to the new schedule before busy Monday.

    4. Keep a good sleep environment

    Going to bed an hour earlier means the sun will still be out a bit. Make sure you keep your baby’s room dark and quiet when you put her down to bed. You might have to use curtains to keep the natural light out.

    5. Stick to your bedtime routine

    Whenever there’s a sleep change, it’s important to keep all other factors consistent. If you give a bath and read a book each night, continue that tradition so your child understand that it’s bedtime, even though it’s happening earlier than usual.

    6. Adjust your typical daytime activities accordingly

    If you’re putting your baby down fifteen minutes early each day, move the other scheduled activities (like feedings, snacks, etc.) fifteen minutes early as well. This will help reinforce the idea of an earlier day.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 13 Safe Sleep Tips for Infants and Toddlers

    Safe Sleep Tips for Infants and ToddlersSafe sleep is of the utmost importance to parents of babies and toddlers. There are many concerns surrounding safe sleeping environments and practices for children today and it’s up to parents to do their research and learn what they should and shouldn’t be doing for their children. Swanling Innovations is committed to providing modern, safe and innovative products for children and providing safe sleep solutions for parents. Here are our top safe sleep tips for infants and toddlers.

    1. Back is Best

    Always place baby on his or her back for sleep – for nighttime sleep AND nap time sleep. The back sleeping position reduces the risk of SIDS.

    2. Swaddling

    Pediatricians recommend swaddling baby for sleep time during the first three months. Babies have the Moro or startle reflex until approximately 3 months of age, which causes them to flail their arms and legs and wake themselves up. Swaddling helps reduce awakenings caused by the startle reflex. Babies sleep better when swaddled and on their backs. The Slumber Swaddle™ with the original Snap-In-Place™ system is the perfect accessory to the Slumber Sleeper™ for newborns and it takes the guesswork out of swaddling! Just snap, wrap and tie. Even though your child may have grown out of swaddling they will be able to continue to feel that wonderful feeling of being held and secure while still using their Slumber Sleeper™, and arms-free sleep sac that uses the same Snap-In-Place™ system.

    3. Temperature Awareness

    Most medical experts recommend a sleep environment of 65-72°F (18-22°C). It is important to dress your baby appropriately for sleep.

    As a general guide, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends dressing baby in no more than one layer more than an adult would use to be comfortable in the same environment. Babies are not good at regulating their own temperatures. No blanket can naturally regulate baby's temperature for them, so parents need to touch and feel their baby to ensure baby is not too hot or too cold. Your baby’s tummy is an excellent representation of their core temperature.

    4. Firm Sleep Surface

    Baby should sleep on a firm sleep surface, in a bassinet, cradle or crib near the mother's bed, without any soft toys, pillows or loose bedding. The Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends a fitted sheet on the baby's mattress. Babies should not be placed for sleep on water beds, quilts, pillows, sheepskins, or other fluffy surfaces.

    5. No Soft Objects

    No soft objects or loose bedding should be in baby's bed during sleep time. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no stuffed animals, no sheepskin, no quilts, no positioners, no pillows, and no bumpers should be in your child’s crib while they are sleeping.

    6. Keep all cords away from crib

    Electrical cords from video monitors, cameras and window treatments should be kept a minimum of three (3) feet away from baby’s crib and secured completely out of child’s reach. Cords are a strangulation hazard.

    7. Smoke Free Environment

    Always keep baby's environment smoke-free by not smoking when pregnant, near your baby, or in an area where your baby spends time or sleeps. Maternal smoking during pregnancy has emerged as a major risk factor in almost every epidemiologic study of SIDS.

    8. Ventilation

    Be sure that air can circulate freely around baby's face. A small fan in baby's room can increase ventilation, but should not blow air directly on baby.

    9. Breastfeeding

    Breastfeeding is encouraged. Breastfeed, if you can. Research shows that any amount of breastfeeding reduces the risk of SIDS along with the many proven physical and emotional benefits breastfeeding offers.

    10. Tummy Time

    Allow time for tummy time when baby is awake and supervised. Place baby on tummy during play time. Please remember that baby should ALWAYS be placed to sleep on his back.

    11. Colic

    Colic is believed to occur when a baby is sensitive to the environment surrounding them-which can cause baby to be very unsettled, or when gas forms in the belly causing discomfort.

    12. White Noise

    Soothing white noise can help your baby sleep more restfully and lessen noise interference that may stir or wake baby causing interrupted sleeping habits.

    13. Wish your child sweet dreams and a restful sleep :)

    The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in-1 safe sleep solution that has longevity unlike most baby products. It’s designed for newborn babies (7lbs) used in conjunction with the Slumber Swaddle and goes up to 2 years and also comes in a twin size for toddlers up to 4 years.  The Slumber Sleeper™ combines a mattress protector, fitted sheet, flat sheet, and a sleep sack all in one to help baby fall asleep and sleep safely throughout the night. The unique design of the Slumber Sleeper™ is intended to keep baby feeling safe, warm, and centered in bed giving them the benefits of long-term sleep training.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • Creating a Bedtime Routine That Works

    creating a bedtime routineJust like you or I, a child can’t switch from moments of high activity to sleep without some transition. To help them get into sleep mode, you should create a predictable routine that you perform just before bed. The sooner you establish a bedtime routine, the happier (and healthier) your whole family will be. Over time, your child will begin to show signs of drowsiness when you begin the routine.

    The details of the routine will change a bit as your child grows, and routines vary between families, but the basics will remain. Here’s how you can set a bedtime routine.

    Pick a Time

    I’m sure you’ve noticed that if you fall asleep at ten one evening, you’re sleepy the next night at the same time. Children are the same. Their bodies adjust to the schedules they keep. Exploit this so they follow a regular pattern and fall asleep without protest.

    Keep it Routine

    Naturally, the most important part of a bedtime routine is consistency. Once you find one that works, stick to it at all costs. Once you set the path, not only do children conform to it, they eventually prefer it. The bedtime procedure should stay the same all through the week, even on weekends. If your family visits Grandma for the holidays, maintain the routine as best you can at her house.

    Provide a Transitional Object

    Separation from you can be hard on many children. It’s helpful to create a transitional object that stands as a substitute for mom or dad when it’s time to go to sleep. This helps them cope with the anxiety of your absence. This object is often a stuffed animal with a personalized name. The Slumber Swan makes for a perfect transitional object.

    Designate a Sleep Environment

    Create a space that welcomes comfort and sleep. Keep distractions out of this room if possible. Play should happen in another room so your child doesn’t subconsciously associate the bedroom with activity and energy. Most importantly, your child should sleep in this place consistently so he or she becomes used to it.

    Popular Bedtime Routine Steps

    Offer a Light Snack – If meal time was a while back, offer something with carbohydrates and protein. The carbs induce sleepiness and the protein maintains blood sugar until the next meal.

    Give a Warning – At a young age, your child won’t understand “ten minutes to bedtime,” but it helps build an association that the day is winding down. This will give them some time to mentally prepare themselves for the change.

    Play Calmly – After-dinner play shouldn’t involve a lot of movement or activity. Play calmly with toys in a seated position. Keep your voice low and the lights dim.

    Give a Warm Bath – By raising your child’s body temperature slightly, you’ll make him or her more prone to sleep. It’s also a way to play in a calm manner. Since you your child can’t crawl or move around much, they won’t excite themselves. (If your baby doesn’t enjoy baths or gets too excited during them, leave this off your routine.)

    Ritual Grooming – Go through the typical end-of-day tasks that anyone else would: brushing teeth and gums, washing hands and face, change of diaper/use potty, etc.

    Dress for Bed – Choose non-binding, comfortable clothes. Let your child choose so they feel a sense of “ownership” over the process.

    Read a Storybook – Stories are the perfect activity just before bedtime because everyone is still, sitting comfortably in bed, and your voice will lull your child to sleep.

    Say Goodnight Briefly – Say goodnight, tell your child you love him or her and then exit the room. Don’t rush back in at the first noise (unless of course you believe you hear distress).

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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