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  • Why Self-Soothing is Important (and 5 Tips How)

    Self-Soothing is ImportantSelf-soothing is an important skill that all babies have to learn eventually. It’s how we all calm ourselves so we can fall back asleep. During the first few months of life, mom and/or dad do all of the soothing. They nurse, comfort, rock or sing to babies to get them to relax.

    But imagine you’re a baby. One minute you fall asleep in mom’s loving arms, the next you wake up alone in a crib. That can be scary! If baby wakes up where she went to sleep, she’ll be relaxed and inclined to fall back asleep.

    But you want your baby to learn to do it on their own at some point so you can actually get a full night’s sleep. They can self-soothe in a number of ways: thumb-sucking, reinserting a pacifier, rubbing a special blanket, or anything else they find calming.

    When do babies learn to self-soothe?

    When babies are born, they aren’t capable of regulating their emotions. They need parents to step in and comfort them when they become angry or scared or frustrated or tired. Some babies gain the ability to self-soothe around three months old. Most have it by six months. You want to start working at self-soothing by six months before any strong sleep associations have formed.

    Why should babies self-soothe?

    Simply, for better sleep! Babies who self-soothe sleep longer and with fewer interruptions. When they wake during non-feeding times, they can quickly fall asleep without waking up anyone else. Plus mom and dad get some sleep too!

    Self-soothing does NOT mean ignoring your baby or letting her cry until she falls asleep.

    How does one teach a baby to self-soothe?

    It’s pretty simple, but you have to stick with it. Once you commit to teaching self-soothing, stick with it unless you think your baby is too young to learn, then you should wait a few more weeks.

    1. Wean baby from the swaddle. They usually need their hands free to self-soothe. That’s why the Slumber Sleeper is perfect, because baby feels safe and secure, but her hands are free to get to her mouth.
    2. Create a strong, consistent sleep routine. There should be a strong signal that it’s sleep time (for night sleep and naps) and several steps that lead to sleep so baby understands the cues.
    3. Lay baby down drowsy, but awake. You want baby to fall asleep without mom or dad’s arms. It might take her a few more minutes to fall asleep, but that’s OK. The goal is to get baby to fall into sleep on her own.
    4. Don’t rush into baby’s room at the first cry. You want to get her a minute or two to self-soothe before you do it for her.
    5. Teach self-soothing before age one. Children who never learn to soothe until after one year old have trouble doing it until they are as old as four.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 7 Reasons to be an Attachment Parent

    Reasons to be an Attachment ParentBelieve it or not, you are probably an attachment parent already.

    Attachment parenting is a parenting style where mom and dad create a close bond with their baby. It’s not a new phenomenon (actually it’s very old), but there are some other parenting styles that people adopt.

    1. Attachment parenting gets a bad rap

    For some reason, attachment parenting has been sensationalized in the media as the hippy mom who lets her children do whatever they want, breastfeeds until age five, and showers as a group. That isn’t attachment parenting.

    2. Attachment parented children have a place of safety

    By building a comforting relationship with your child, he is more likely to be adventurous and try new things. You aren’t creating a dependency, you are giving your child a sphere of safety they can return to after their new experiences. When they know there is somewhere safe to return to, they will become more outgoing.

    3. Attachment parented babies feel less anxiety

    Long-term exposure to anxiety can have an impact on a person’s psychology. That’s why it’s important to meet your baby’s needs as quickly as possible so they don’t spend too much time in that anxious state. When babies are kept close and monitored by their parents, their needs are met quickly and they spend more time in quiet contentment.

    4. Attachment parenting fosters learning

    Infancy is the most crucial learning period of your baby’s life. Experts believe that since attachment parented infants feel safe, less stressed, and secure, they are in a more optimal position to learn.

    5. Attachment parented children learn how to build relationships

    Children who were raised in an attachment parenting environment tend be more popular in school and have more friends. When a person learns how to form a close relationship with someone at a very young age, they carry that sophistication with them through their life.

    6. Attachment parented children have better relationships with their parents later in life

    We all understand that our job is to make productive, healthy people, but we all wants to be friends with our kids as well. When parents and children form close bonds in early in life, those bonds remain forever. Once the child-rearing years are behind you, a valuable friendship remains.

    7. Attachment parenting calls for positive discipline

    Positive discipline is far more effective than negative. Positive discipline encourages children to repeat behaviors (like good manners, sharing, etc.), whereas negative discipline only teaches kids to avoid the punishment. The attachment parent can discipline positively for best results.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 6 Tips to Encourage Independent Play in Babies

    Encourage Independent Play in BabiesAs much as we love our kids, at some point we have to put them down just so we can get some things done. It’s also good for their health and development if they spend some time occupying themselves. After all, you can’t be by their side their entire life. If you think your baby is ready to starting playing independently, here are some tips.

    1. Meet all baby’s needs first. It’s tough to expect a baby to try something new if something is bothering him. Before asking he play by himself, make sure he’s not hungry, thirty, wet or tried. He should be just coming off a nap so his mind is fresh.

    2. Change environments. Your baby can’t complain to be bored like a toddler, but if he’s staring at toys or his play mat uninterested, try switching rooms. If you give him something new to do, he’ll likely start playing again.

    3. Provide open-ended toys. Some toys (like game sets) have very specific ways of playing with them and you can’t really deviate. But toys like blocks, play houses, dress up clothes and art supplies offer endless possibilities and your baby won’t become bored so quickly.

    4. Make sure you are providing attention. You’ll find it hard to get your baby to play independently if he is starved for attention. Make sure you are giving undivided attention several times a day so he always feels it’s available from you.

    5. Stop by often. When your baby is playing independently, stop by every few minutes to jump in on the action. Do this especially when he begins to seem unsettled. Each time you step away, stay away a few minutes longer. This will teach him that solo play time is safe and mom/dad is always near.

    6. Give a quick how-to. Your baby might not be aware that he can play with toys by himself if you’ve always done it with him. Show him how to bang his piano or bounce a ball. This will encourage him to try.

    7. Make toys easily available. We love a tidy, organized home, but it doesn’t do your kids any good if they can’t access their toys. Keep them low and in containers kids can access whenever they want. Will this mean you’ll have rooms strewn with toys? Yes, probably, but it’s good for their development.

    8. Encourage their favorites. If your child shows an interest in a particular toy or topic (like birds or outer space), make sure there are plenty of play options that relate. Your child is likely to play by himself if he’s really interested.

    luxe floor pillowGuest Blog by Cindy Perry, Inventor of the pello, Luxe Floor Pillows

    Cindy, a Texas girl, put herself through college working at a children’s library and sewing at night. When she met her husband and had her two boys, she decided to stay home to care for them while designing window treatments and bedding.

    When Cindy’s first son was learning to sit up, he would always fall through the pillows she set around him, hit his head, and cry. Besides, setting her child down on the hardwood floors on just a blanket always seemed so cold. Using her years of sewing and design skills, Cindy took inspiration from a woman in her breastfeeding class and got to work. With some scrap fabric and a few tweaks, pello was born! pello is a luxefloor pillow that helps children feel safe, warm and protected.

    For more information, visit mypello.com.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 6 Tips for Dealing with Temper Tantrums

    Dealing with Temper TantrumsWe’ve all seen them: the kid having a meltdown on the grocery store floor, rolling around and screaming. When it’s not our kid, we can look away and pretend it’s not happening. But what happens when that is our child? Use these tips to help beat tantrums.

    1. Understand the Nature of the Beast

    Your child is not the first or the last to throw a temper tantrum. In fact, these childish antics are to be especially expected between ages 1-3. There are countless triggers. Sometimes toddlers lash out in frustration simply because they can’t tell you what it is they want.

    Instead of losing your cool, understand that your child has clocked out mentally and they are completely beside themselves. Scientifically speaking, your toddler has allowed his emotions to supersede the frontal cortex of the brain. You know… the part that makes decisions and puts forth our better judgment. There is very little you can do change the toddler’s mental state in this moment, so spare yourself the pity party. You are still as great a parent as the next person.

    2. Give Them Choices

    The word “no” can trigger rage in a passionate toddler seeking his independence. Instead of barking commands, try to give your child a choice in what happens next. For example, if your goal is to get your little one to bed, give them specific choices like “Do you want to wear your red pajamas or your blue pajamas?” By prompting a toddler to focus on making a decision you are giving them control of their own lives while passively encouraging them to do what it is you need them to do.

    3. Hug it Out

    Human touch is powerful. Going in for a hug may not be what you want to do when your little one is having a meltdown, but sometimes a strong hug is all your toddler needs. We all want to feel safe and understood even when we’re freaking out. When you’re hugging your irate toddler, let your toddler vent.

    4. Ignore the Mayhem

    “Ignore” may seem like a harsh word, but the fundamental benefit is nipping a bad habit in the bud. Getting angry along with your toddler usually escalates the tantrum. Instead try to say things like “Mommy is going to leave you alone until you calm down,” or “Let me know when you’re ready to talk.” Giving too much attention to temper tantrums simply enables the behavior to continue. When you give these meltdowns no play, you show your toddler that their unruly behavior is not an effective way to communicate a message.

    5. Laugh if Off

    It’s natural to feel embarrassed when your child is having a public tantrum. The silent judgment you feel from the stares of strangers doesn’t help. Instead of bowing your head in shame, try to have a sense of humor about it by sharing a laugh with innocent bystanders. They are more than likely to smile back at you and be sympathetic.

    6. Flee the Scene! 

    In the event that your child’s tantrum has sent them into absolute menace-to-society mode, take ‘em outside. Sometimes children are not comfortable with their environment or perhaps need a second to collect themselves. Now’s the perfect time to give your toddler a hug, a pep-talk and the air they need to get back down to planet earth.

    luxe floor pillowGuest Blog by Cindy Perry, Inventor of the pello, Luxe Floor Pillows

    Cindy, a Texas girl, put herself through college working at a children’s library and sewing at night. When she met her husband and had her two boys, she decided to stay home to care for them while designing window treatments and bedding.

    When Cindy’s first son was learning to sit up, he would always fall through the pillows she set around him, hit his head, and cry. Besides, setting her child down on the hardwood floors on just a blanket always seemed so cold. Using her years of sewing and design skills, Cindy took inspiration from a woman in her breastfeeding class and got to work. With some scrap fabric and a few tweaks, pello was born! pello is a luxefloor pillow that helps children feel safe, warm and protected.

    For more information, visit mypello.com.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 5 Tips for Starting to Potty Train

    Tips for Starting to Potty TrainPotty training is never easy for parents or children. Some kids even become afraid of using the potty and outright refuse to use it. However, it’s an inevitable part of growing up, so every parent needs some tips to get started when the time comes. Here are some steps to try.

    The Introduction

    Slowly introducing the potty to your child’s life is a great first step on the road to potty training. A subtle introduction is helpful at first, especially if you have a feeling that your child may have fears of the toilet. Try reading children’s books on the subject, or including your child in the process of choosing a starter potty to begin the process.

    Equipment

    Choosing the perfect potty for your child is another initial step to begin potty training. Whether you end up buying a full potty that sits on the floor, or a potty seat that goes on top of a toilet, make sure to involve your child in the process. Let them decide which they would feel more comfortable using. Also, if you choose the potty seat, make sure to provide them with a step stool so they have a place to rest their feet for more comfort.

    Encouragement

    Encouraging your child along the way is necessary during the potty training process. Offer plenty of praise when they do something right, and be understanding if a mistake is made. Try to make them feel better about the process by offering a story of your own (whether you remember or not), describing the troubles you had as a child.

    Signs of Interest

    Since you certainly don’t want to rush your child into doing something they’re nervous or fearful of, you should wait to see some signs of interest in the potty. Signs of readiness to start learning include: general interest in how the potty works, uncomfortable in dirty diapers, talks about or brings up the potty, has begun dressing himself, and/or has some regularity to their bathroom schedule.

    Make it a Habit

    Ritualizing the process of using a potty is important to getting your child into a good habit. You can try having your child sit on the potty every couple hours or so, at specific times of the day. Make time for this habit of sitting on the potty, and try to make it fun for him/her by reading a book or playing a game!

    eco-friendly and non-toxic baby bottlesGuest Blog by Christine Barlow, Inventor of 5 Phases Eco-Friendly Baby Bottle System

    Mom Christine Barlow is the inventor of 5 Phases eco-friendly and non-toxic baby bottles, the safest and healthiest way to bottle feed your baby. Her inspiration in creating an alternative to traditional feeding bottles came after the birth of her 1lb 7oz micro-preemie baby. Having a compromised child, she became aware how environmental factors were affecting our children. With all the concerns of plastics and infants being the most vulnerable, she felt there was a need for more options for parents who wanted to use glass. She knew she had to act – and the 5 Phases Hybrid Glass Baby Bottles were born.

    5 Phases is dedicated to helping families achieve a healthier and organic lifestyle. Starting with baby, they develop products keeping both the environment and health of your family in mind. And when it comes to your baby nothing else will do – Christine knows, she’s a mom too!

    For more information on 5 Phases, visit www.5phases.com!

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 5 Tips to Teach Your Children How to Share

    Teach Your Children How to ShareLearning to share is a normal part of growing up. Kids aren’t built to know how to do this themselves. Parents need to encourage their children to share until the kids start picking it up on their own. This will help turn your children into compassionate, empathetic adults who work well with others. Here are some tips.

    1. Teach taking turns

    If you have two children who want to play with the same item, teach them that they can share by taking turns. You can tell them that they each have 10 minutes to play with the toy and then set a timer. Once the timer goes off it’s the other child’s turn to play with the toy. Not only are they learning how to share, they are also learning patience and delaying gratification. If the children cannot agree to take turns, take the toy away and tell them that neither can play with the toy until they can learn to share.

    2. Set some basic rules

    A young child may not fully understand the concept of sharing right away, but they can follow basic rules that will help them learn how to share. These rules can include teaching them to wait their turn and that if they walk away from a toy, that means it’s free for another child to play with it. Also teach them that if they brings toys along to a play date, everyone gets to play with those toys too.

    3. Donate old toys

    When your children have too many toys in their playroom or get news ones for their birthday or other holidays, donate some to a charity or children’s shelter.  Talk to your child and explain what it means to donate toys and why it’s a good idea to share with the less fortunate. You can even bring your child to a toy store and ask them to pick out items to donate.

    4. Let them see you share.

    Children look to their parents and often emulate their actions and behaviors. Share things with your child, like a cookie or ice cream and ask him to share things with you. If your child is cold, share a blanket with him, and offer the same to other members of your family. Let them know that you would love to share some of your ice cream with them and describe your sharing interactions to them.

    5. Make it fun

    Give your child small toys and rewards to share with some friends. It could be a sheet of stickers or some snacks to be divided evenly with each of his friends. Give your child positive reinforcement by saying how nice it is of him to share with friends and how his friends must feel happy to have a friend who likes to share.

    winter hat, gloves and scarf for babies and toddlersGuest Blog by Christina Plejdrup, Mom and Inventor of the Minkey

    Christina Plejdrup is a mother of a 3-year-old girl, Oliva, who tried many different winter products to see if she could find anything that could get her daughter to keep her gloves on as well as her hat and scarf. Christina tried everything, but nothing worked!

    After several failed attempts to get her daughter to keep her gloves, hat and scar on, Christina designed her own solution! It worked like a charm and when they would walk through their neighborhood, several parents asked where they found such a unique and practical winter garment.  This is when the Minkey (as her daughter calls it) was born.

    The Minkey is a unique 3-in-1 winter hat, gloves and scarf for babies and toddlers. It’s easy to use and goes great under any jacket, snowsuit or vest, and children have plenty of comfort and movement. They will always stay warm and dry where it is important while out in the cold.

    The Minkey is now an award-winning product adored by parents and kids all over the globe!  Visit http://www.theolie.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • Managing Separation Anxiety

    Managing Separation AnxietyBabies under six months old get by just fine without mom and dad for a night or two, but by seven or eight months, they have learned object permanence. Object permanence is the concept that things and people exist even when they are out of our sight. Baby knows you’re somewhere, so he feels stressed because you aren’t with him. If your baby fusses and struggles when you leave, here are some tips on dealing with his separation anxiety.

    1. Create a good-bye ritual.

    Create a simple ritual that you perform every time you leave for the day. Make it something memorable. You could sing a short rhyme, give hugs and kisses, and then leave. Do not return. If you return because you see or hear your child crying, you’ll just make it harder in the long run.

    2. Practice leaving.

    Games like peek-a-boo help and “Where’s Mommy?’ give your child some separation practice. Practice leaving for short periods of time by going into the other room while another caregiver watches baby. Perform your good-bye ritual and step into your bedroom for a few moments.

    3. Socialize with the sitter.

    Ideally, your regular daycare provider would be someone you interact with often, like a grandparent or close friend. You want baby to be close with this person so he doesn’t feel alone when you leave. If you’ll be putting your child in daycare, opt to spend a few hours at the facility with baby so he spends time with the care providers.

    4. Provide a consistent pattern.

    Kids thrive on predictability. If you usually drop your child off to daycare in the morning, continue this routine even on days where you don’t work as early.

    5. Offer a sense of control.

    Ask your child if he wants to play with the blocks or the coloring books when he gets to daycare. It doesn’t matter what he answers, but by choosing something, he has gained an element of control over his day and won’t feel powerless.

    6. Keep calm yourself.

    If your child sees you struggling with the separation, he isn’t going to handle it well himself. Keep your emotions in check and stay positive.

    7. Meet all of your child’s needs before leaving.

    Separations are harder when your child is hungry, sick, tired or needs a change. Solve all of these problems beforehand and leave when your baby is usually happy and alert (typically mornings).

    8. Send some favorite items.

    If the separation is taking place outside the home, pack along some favorite items that make baby comfortable.

    pacifier holderGuest Blog by Julie Tabor Thompson, Founder & President of Bounce Innovations, Inventor of PullyPalz

    As a mother of two, Julie found she was continuously retrieving dropped pacifiers, because even though they spit them out, they still want them immediately! She called it "the pacifier game," and, at times, it was difficult to play. One day, she thought, 'I wish somebody would invent a ...' A what? What could make it so babies can keep up with their pacifiers? Clips help parents keep up with pacifiers, but they don't help the baby. Babies don't understand when it's behind their shoulder or around their side. As they say, out of sight, out of mind. She started by making the first prototype in her kitchen (which included melting molding plastic, an instruction manual for her sewing machine, and YouTube videos). Several designs later, the PullyPalz were born... The first ever pacifier toy that - with the help of baby's interaction - keeps pacis coming back!

    Her goal is to offer unique products that make life and parenthood just a little easier, and ultimately more enjoyable. Compatible products (teethers and toys) will be coming to market soon. Julie also offers product development and consultation services for other aspiring entrepreneurs.

    For more information, visit www.pullypalz.com.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • Your Baby’s Sleep Development

    baby sleep development guideDuring the first year of your baby’s life, you’ll be privileged to witness a myriad of changes and developmental achievements. You’ll witness his sleep schedule change to meet the demands of his growing body. Here’s a summary of your baby’s sleep development by age and what to expect.

    Birth to Three Months

    During this period your baby will sleep a lot, up to 18 hours per day. However, he’ll only sleep for three or four hours at a time in between feedings. Tame the sleepless nights using a safe swaddle for baby.

    Your baby’s sleep cycle is far shorter than ours, including more time in the easily-disturbed phases. This type of rest is critical for proper brain development.

    You can help your baby sleep during this time by recognizing when he’s tired. After two hours of wakefulness, he’ll need sleep. Don’t let him become overtired or he’ll struggle to slumber. Learn the sleepy cues: he’s sleepy if he rubs his eyes, swats at his ears, whines at the slightest stimuli, becomes quiet and still, yawns a lot, or loses interest in people and toys. He’ll also probably push his face into your chest or skin to block out stimulations.

    You can help him begin to recognize day time versus night time by being especially active during the day (socializing, playing, talking, keeping the house bright) and relaxed and calm in the evenings.

    Three Months to Six Months

    At this point your baby will still sleep 15 hours per day, but a long stretch of that will take place at night. The rest is likely divided amongst a few daytime napes. By six months he should be capable of sleeping throughout the night without interruption (even without a feeding).

    Make sure to set clearly established bedtimes and naptimes. Earlier, determining when to sleep was as simple was watching for the signs. Now you have to take a bit of control. He’ll need consistency to regulate his sleep patterns.

    You should also be developing a bedtime routine that you’ll follow each evening. Some popular bedtime routine activities include a quiet game, a warm bath, a bedtime story, lullaby, and a gentle massage. Using a product like the Slumber Sleeper™ - a 4-in-1 mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet, and sleep sack - every night will allow baby that consistency and familiarity they associate with sleep time. Use whatever routine works for you, but stay consistent.

    Six to Nine Months

    By this time your baby should be sleeping up to seven to 11 hours per night. He’s probably waking briefly during the night, but he has learned how to soothe himself back to sleep. That’s a great sign!

    Continue to keep consistent times with the morning and afternoon naps. Continue to follow your bedtime routine. It’s important at this point to introduce as much stability as you can into your baby’s schedule. That includes lunches, snacks, and bouts of activity during the day. Regular activities will help your baby fall asleep more easily when it’s time.

    At this age, your baby might be waking up at night due to the teething or separation anxiety. He may also wake up and begin experimenting with his new skills: siting up, rolling over, and crawling. After a bit of movement, he might find it tough to settle back down. If he calls for you, pause before rushing into the room. He may figure out how to fall asleep himself.

    Nine to Twelve Months

    Sleep is still crucial to his development. At this point your baby is still sleeping 10 to 11 hours at night with two shorter naps during the day. Maintain his consistent daytime and bedtime schedules. He should be well in sync by now.

    You may hear your baby standing up in the crib, cruising back and forth and even shouting for you at night. He’s begun to become aware that you still exist when you aren’t around, and the separation makes him anxious. It’s up to you if you go into the room at night, but remember to give him plenty of opportunities to fall asleep on his own. With the Slumber Sleeper™, baby is more likely to go back to sleep alone sooner and parents have peace of mind that baby is safe in crib.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • Imaginary Meets Educational

    "10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1! Ready. Set. Liftoff!" Michael, a bright four year old, said. "Off to outer space." Then, out of nowhere, he corrected me saying, "You're not doing it right. You have to float. You are in outer space...remember???"
    Then, I realized the value of play and creativity together. We always hear that play is always valuable learning time, but we don't always see it in action.
    Our minds wander when we are immersed in action. For a child, it's not any different. The world is an open playing field. Who is here to say that this space shuttle is not real? The imagination yields for lots of opportunities for learning combined with play.
    Children see past the idea that the playground equipment is only a replica space shuttle and not an actual one. They gravitate to the opportunity at hand to play and explore.
    It's your job as parents and friends of children to keep the creativity going and play along. As adults, we can offer more details in this level of play. Bring the learning experience to the imagination world. Float in outer space. Buckle up before lift off and pull the throttle all the way back. Look out the window, and you are seeing Mars up close. Did you see that comet soar across near the big dipper?
    The options are endless, but it all starts with your enthusiasm towards play and the imaginary to bring forth the educational and learning side.
    Who said learning can't be fun?

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