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Tag Archives: health

  • 11 Things to Consider When Choosing Your Child’s Pediatrician

    Choosing Your Child’s PediatricianChoosing a pediatrician for your new baby is an intensely personal decision. You want to find the right doctor that you can stick with through the years so your child becomes comfortable. Here are some things you ought to consider as you make your decision.

    1. Is the doctor accredited? This is usually a simple check that’s worth 10 seconds of your time. Is the doctor licensed? Where did he go to school?

    2. What are his office hours? Obviously you need someone who holds office hours that work for your schedule. If you work 9-6 and your so does your doctor, you’ll constantly be rescheduling your life to make an appointment.

    3. What is the staff’s demeanor? Your child will be interacting with the doctor and his staff (administrators and nurses). You want these people to be calm and kind to alleviate fear.

    4. Can you make phone calls? Are they returned timely? Oddly, some offices don’t take phone calls. They force you to make an appointment. But you’ll want the flexibility to be able to ask the doctor or a nurse a quick question.

    5. Does your doctor have any hospital appointments? If your child is hospitalized, will your doctor play a role in the care or will you have to find a new doctor with hospital access?

    6. What are the other physicians like? Many doctors practice in a group. If you need care on your doctor’s day off, you’ll end up with another doctor, so make sure they are acceptable substitutes.

    7. Does the doctor coordinate specialists? If your child develops a complex illness, will your doctor work with the other specialists or push you onto a different pediatrician to handle the load?

    8. Does the doctor speak in plain English? You want a doctor who will skip the medical jargon and tell you straight what’s going on with your child. Does he throw big terms at you (that you can’t possibly know) or speak plainly?

    9. Does the doctor care? Or is he just trying to cram as many patients (and billings) into the same day as possible?

    10. What are the doctor’s values? Some people have some specific requirements in a doctor for spiritual/personal/religious reasons. Your doctor doesn’t have to agree with those requirements, but be willing to provide care that fits in line with them.

    11. What is his reputation? To answer this question, you’ll have to ask around. Ask people you know what they have heard about the practice. Get some testimonials from current or previous patients about their experiences.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • What is Hip Dysplasia?

    What is Hip Dysplasia

    When babies are born, it takes some time for their joints to stretch out naturally. Surely you’ve seen your little ones with their knees, ankles, hips, elbows, wrists and even fingers bent at all times. Over time, the joints stretch out and your baby gains full, natural control.

    The hip joint is a ball and socket. Since babies are naturally flexible (on account of life in the womb), it’s possible for the ball to be loose in the socket. If the hips are forced into a stretched-out position too long, the ball can wear down the soft cartilage edges of the socket. This is called hip dysplasia. It can range from very mild (having loose ligaments) to severe (where the ball pops out of the socket, called a dislocation). Even in the mildest form, hip dysplasia can lead to various problems later in life.

    When is the risk for hip dysplasia greatest?

    The risk is greatest during the first few months of life. By the sixth month, babies have doubled in size and the hips are far more developed. The ligaments are stronger and the ball is less likely to press against the edges of the socket.

    Is hip dysplasia serious?

    Even though hip dysplasia doesn’t cause babies any pain, it’s a serious condition. It can lead to osteoarthritis and eventually a hip replacement later in life. It’s the most common hip developmental deformity in children. 1-2 of every 1000 babies experiences it.

    What causes hip dysplasia?

    The exact causes of hip dysplasia aren’t known. It’s widely believed to be a developmental problem because of the time period it emerges, but there’s also something of a genetic component. Children are 30 times more likely to suffer from hip dysplasia when there is a family history of it.

    What can parents do to prevent hip dysplasia?

    For many babies, there’s nothing parents can do to prevent it. Some cases are present at birth. The problem can be made worse, however, from improper swaddling and baby wearing and car seats.

    Proper baby wearing puts the child’s hips in a V-shape with their knees higher than their bottom. This position supports the hips and keeps the ball tight in the socket. The legs should not be hanging straight down. Here’s a picture from the International Hip Dysplasia Institute that illustrates how baby should be carried.

    Swaddling correctly must be emphasized. In the past, some people would advise swaddling a baby tightly all over, but this is a mistake. When you swaddle a baby, it’s important to leave room around the hips and legs so baby can pull his knees up and move his lower body around.

    Further, make sure that you use a swaddle that is recognized as being “hip healthy” by the International Hip Dysplasia Institute.  Both the Swanling Slumber Sleeper and Slumber Swaddle are recognized products by the IHDI because they do not put any strain on baby’s hips, all while promoting the feelings of comfort, safety and security.

    Car seats aren’t usually much of a concern, but some older models can press a child’s legs together. Make sure they have plenty of room to separate their legs and pull up their knees if they prefer.

    What are some signs to look out for?

    • An asymmetrical buttock crease
    • A click or pop when baby moves his hips
    • Limited range of motion (baby can’t fully spread his legs at diaper time)
    • Pain (this is only a symptom during young adulthood or adolescence)

    An exaggerated walking limp or step length discrepancy (also kn

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 3 Reasons to Get Those Kids Sleeping

    reasons to help kids get sleepWe all know kids need to get plenty of sleep. Sleep is crucial to helping kids develop both physically and mentally, which is why they will spend approximately 40 percent of their childhood sleeping.

    I always advise that children have an early bedtime that parents stick to no matter what…unfortunately, that means leaving summertime beach parties before the bonfire starts up, or putting the kids to bed even though Grandma and Grandpa want to spend time with them after Christmas dinner. Sometimes it can be hard and parents have to stand their ground. But in the end you have a well-rested child and far less nighttime tantrums. Kids who get to stay up late with their family and crash when their parents do are far more likely to be cranky and miserable the next day.

    If you need a little more incentive for making sure your child is getting a good night’s sleep, here are my top-3 reasons to make good sleep habits a priority in your family:

    1. For your child’s health

    There are no two ways about it: experts all agree that sleep is vital to good health. Children who don’t get enough sleep are prone to a long list of potential negative side effects. Here are just a few:

    Obesity

    There have been many studies linking childhood obesity with lack of sleep. A recent study from the International Journal of Obesity looked at 422 children between the ages of 5 and 10. Researchers measured and weighed the children and asked their parents about their sleeping habits. They discovered that 20 percent of the boys and 24 percent of the girls studied were overweight or obese, and the  children who slept less than 10 hours a night were 3 1/2 times more likely to be overweight than those who slept 12 hours or more.

    Researchers still aren’t certain exactly why less sleep equals potential weight gain, but there are a few practical possibilities. The more tired you are, the less active you are, so a sleepy child is far more likely to sit in front of the TV with a bowl of potato chip than to run around and play tag with the neighbours. There is also some evidence that lack of sleep can trigger a hormonal response that makes you feel hungrier.

    ADHD

    While lack of sleep may not directly cause ADHD, a lot of the symptoms of ADHD are mimicked by kids who are not sleeping enough, such as irritability, hyperactivity, difficulty concentrating and impulsive behaviour.

    But according to the National Sleep Foundation, for kids who do have ADHD, too little sleep may significantly impact their ADHD symptoms. One study found that treating sleep problems could even be enough to eliminate attention and hyperactivity issues for some children.

    School Performance

    It seems to only make sense that kids who aren’t getting enough rest will be groggy and have trouble concentrating in school. But the research on academic performance is pretty shocking. One study showed that kids with C's, D's and F's got about 25 fewer minutes of sleep and went to bed an average of 40 minutes later than A and B students. Kids who aren’t sleeping enough just will not have the ability to focus on, or even care about, their school work.

    2. For your health

    Let’s face it, if your child isn’t getting enough sleep then you probably aren’t either. Babies and young children who consistently wake up throughout the night or go to bed late will be keeping their parents up as well. When your child goes down at 7 p.m. you will have a couple of kid-free hours to yourself to restore and revive and then you’ll still have plenty pf time to get lots of rest yourself. It’s so important for parents to take good care of themselves so they can take care of their children without feeling exhausted and overwhelmed.

    3. For the health of the family

    Families who get enough sleep often claim to be more fulfilled. Being tired causes grumpiness, irritability and impatience, so families who aren’t sleeping well will be less likely to have fun together and be active when they’re battling fatigue.

    Teaching your children to take care of themselves by getting enough sleep is one of the biggest gifts you can give them, and it starts with your family habits. Sleeping well as a child will set them up for being a well-adjusted adult with less likelihood for issues like insomnia when they’re older.

    Sleep Sense Founder Dana OblemanGuest Blog by Dana Obleman, Creator of The Sleep Sense Program

    Dana launched her successful private practice in 2003, and since then has helped over 30,000 of parents solve their children’s sleep problems. She is the creator of “The Sleep Sense Program,” a best-selling do-it-yourself guide for sleep deprived parents. Dana has made numerous television appearances, has been featured in national and local newspapers, spoken at multiple parenting trade shows and baby conventions. She was also invited to lecture on solving infant and toddler sleep problems to Family Physicians, through the University of British Columbia. In addition, to a BA in Psychology, Dana also holds a degree in Elementary Education from King’s University (1999), and is a professional member of the National Sleep Foundation.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

    Photo Credit: matthewreid via Compfight cc

  • How Light is Keeping Your Baby Awake and 4 Ways to Stop It

    nightlight keeping baby awakeIn order to provide safe and effective sleep for our kids, we have to optimize their sleep environment. That means making their sleep space as comfortable and non-disruptive as possible. Just like adults, too much light keeps children awake, but you’ll also be surprised to know that the color of the light is also important.

    The light-dark cycle we’re exposed to every day is how we regulate our sleep cycle (or circadian rhythm) and even some of the hormones in our body. However, we often put night lights in our children’s rooms to make them feel safe, but they can cause more harm than good.

    Even if our kids (or adults) fall asleep in a room with gentle light, the brain can detect that light through the eyelids. This could inhibit the production of melatonin, a hormone that helps control our sleep-wake cycles. Typically melatonin is high in the late evening and throughout the night, then begins to decrease towards the morning. Essentially, it keeps you asleep.

    Blue, white and green spectrum light are both melatonin-suppressive. They stop your body from making melatonin, which eventually cause us to rise. This is the type of light emitted from electronic devices and most household lightbulbs.

    From a Harvard study: “While light of any kind can suppress the secretion of melatonin, blue light does so more powerfully. Harvard researchers and their colleagues conducted an experiment comparing the effects of 6.5 hours of exposure to blue light to exposure to green light of comparable brightness. The blue light suppressed melatonin for about twice as long as the green light and shifted circadian rhythms by twice as much (3 hours vs. 1.5 hours).”

    What’s even worse: some research shows that blue light may contribute to cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.

    Here are some ways you can make the sleep space as conducive to sleep as possible:

    1. Nix the nightlights

    The change might be tough to make, especially if your children are used to sleeping with nightlights, but their health is worth it. A simple and effective way to remove nightlights is to move them out of the room over time. Move them from their usual position to an outlet near the door, then an outlet in the hallway, down the hallway, etc. Eventually you’ll be able to do away with them without incident.

    2. Turn off electronic devices

    Make sure all televisions and computers are switched off during the night. Studies have shown that those children who watched TV and played video games before going to bed took longer to fall asleep than those who watched none at all. Even the light from alarm clocks can interfere with their sleep. (Most people don’t have an alarm clock in the nursery, but it’s worth mentioning since these sleep tips apply to anyone at any age.)

    3. Use red tone lights

    You’ll need light in some places, like the hallway or bathroom for when kids wake up. Use lights that work on the red spectrum so they don’t disrupt sleep. Here are three great options: the Himalayan Salt Lamp, the Ikea Patrull Nightlight and the OriGlam Light Color Change Humidifier.

    4. Install blackout curtains

    Blackout curtains are a great way to keep outside light out of the room. These don’t just stop the sunlight. They also stop car headlights, street lamps, moonlight and other weather related light from penetrating the room and keeping your little one awake. They also reduce your heating and cooling costs.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • How to Develop a Sleep Schedule for Baby

    develop a sleep schedule for babyIf you can establish a successful sleep schedule for your child, it can make your life a whole lot easier. Also, a sleep schedule will put your baby on track for a much healthier lifestyle as they grow older. Try to use the following guidelines to get started but the key to developing a sleep schedule is using the techniques that work best for you.

    (Keep in mind that there’s no need to usher your child toward a sleep schedule during the first three months. For health reasons, it’s best to allow your baby to sleep whenever he or she prefers.)

    Start Early

    If possible, try to start a sleep schedule as soon as your child is able to fulfill the guidelines you’re putting in place. Once a consistent bedtime is established, the rest of the day will fall into place a lot easier.

    Establish a Routine

    One of the best ways to signal to your child that it’s almost time to go to sleep is by initiating the established routine you have set for them. Whether this routine includes brushing their teeth, taking a bath, putting on pajamas, reading a story, or other ideas, practicing this habitual schedule will slowly get them ready for bedtime. By the time all the pre-bedtime tasks are completed, your child’s body will know it’s time for the lights to be turned off.

    Night and Day

    When a child is very young, they sometimes get their nights and days mixed up due to all the occasional naps and weird sleep schedules they develop. When it’s daytime, try to keep the house bright and active so there’s no chance of them confusing it for bedtime. Play active games and speak to baby often.

    At night, the house should be dim or dark and there shouldn’t be any noises or loud conversations. Speak soothingly and play quietly. They need to know that night is for sleeping and day is for everything else!

    Make the Sacrifice

    When you’re first starting out on establishing your child’s sleep routine, there may be times when you have to make a sacrifice of staying up very late or waking up very early. Also, try to observe their patterns throughout the first few weeks to see which times of the day and night they’re most active or docile. Once a sleep schedule is in place, make sure that vacations, long events, and outings, etc. don’t make you deviate from it at all. The smallest interference could have a big impact on a young child.

    Expect Changes

    As your baby grows, you’ll have to change and adapt the sleep schedule to meet his changing needs. Baby will need fewer naps and more daytime stimulation, but sleep longer stretches at night. Embrace these changes as a sign that your little one is growing up.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • The Dangers of Side Sleeping – Baby Sleep Safety

    dangers of side sleepingAs we know, it’s imperative that babies sleep on their backs to reduce the likelihood of SIDS. Years of research has shown that it’s best for a baby to sleep on his back in a crib without pillows, blankets, toys or bumpers, as all of these can be suffocation hazards. (This goes for naps too!)

    Around four months, however, babies have developed enough strength and control to roll on to their sides. This is a concern for many parents. A baby sleeping on his side runs an equal risk of succumbing to SIDS as he would sleeping on his stomach, but he hasn’t grown out of the age where SIDS is a concern.

    Some parents try to pull their child’s arm outwards and perpendicular to their body to act as a stabilizer. This way, if they roll a bit, they physically stop themselves from rolling too far. But this isn’t really a solution. By this age, babies have plenty of control over their arms.

    When we were at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference, many doctors reported that one of the most frequent questions they received from parents was what to do when their children roll on to their sides or stomachs during the night, but aren’t able to roll back. The doctors admitted that they didn’t have an answer for this as they don’t want parents going in repeatedly during the night to turn the child back.

    Several doctors pointed out to us that they felt the Slumber Sleeper held a distinct advantage over other baby products in this regard. You see, the Slumber Sleeper has what one might call a self-regulating quality that prevents babies in the five month range (the window when rolling starts but SIDS risks remain) from moving themselves into an unsafe position.

    We don’t want to constrain our children. Some movement is necessary for healthy sleep. As Dr. Sears says, “freedom of breathing implies freedom to adjust body position as needed.” The Slumber Sleeper is not a rigid positioner, but it provides just the right amount of resistance to keep children of this particular age still.

    Yes, in the short term, your five-month-old child will find the resistance of the Slumber Sleeper frustrating, but that is far better than gambling against SIDS. Until you pass the 6 month threshold, safety is far more important than comfort. Furthermore, like we were told at the conference, this is a big issue that parents are concerned about, so it needed addressing.

    In the long term, however, your child will age out of this window and the risk of SIDS will reduce dramatically. Within a very short period, your child will have the strength and dexterity to turn forward and backward within the Slumber Sleeper and can sleep as they wish. This is the point at which children look forward to the routine they have in the Slumber Sleeper and bedtime becomes even more enjoyable for the child. With their new found strength they can now move around as they wish while still staying centered in the crib. Magic!

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 10 Coconut Oil Benefits for Mom and Children (and Dad too)

    Coconut oil is the latest craze on the market today. With the benefits and chemical properties of coconut oil, there is no doubt about this oil being at the top of the list. It has antibacterial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. It's an oil that you can use from cooking to a moisturizer.

    Here's some top ways to help your children and can also help mom and dad too.

    1. Massage

    Forget about other lotions and oil, put a little bit of coconut oil (We love Nutiva unrefined coconut oil) on your finger tips and start giving your little one a massage that moisturizes their skin as well.

    2. Speed Healing of Cuts and Sunburns

    If your child spent too much time in the sun and is starting to get a sunburn or even has a cut, the antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties make coconut oil at the top of the treatment list. Mix with a few drops of lavender essential oil and rub directly onto the burn or cut. It will heal in a fraction of the time, and your skin will not peel.

    3. Hair

    Use directly onto scalp and at the ends of hair as a conditioner. It will tame unruly hair, moisturize, and can get rid of infant's cradle cap.

    4. Increases Breast Milk in Breastfeeding Mothers

    If you are a breastfeeding mother, your milk supply is key to your child receiving all of it's nutrients and minerals. With the large amount of saturated healthy fats, it keeps your hormones optimal, which in turn keeps you producing the right amount of breast milk.

    5. Diaper Rash

    Instead of over the counter creams try coconut oil. Use a small amount and rub directly onto skin. Watch the rash disappear in a fraction of the time.

    6. Eczema

    Is your child battling dry, itchy skin that tends to breakout easily? Use coconut oil as a moisturizer and watch the skin clear up. Also works well for acne for both children and adults.

    7. Bug Bites

    It's still summertime and the bugs are out in full force. If your child is constantly scratching and itchy from bites, use a little bit of coconut oil on the skin as it relieves itchiness.

    8. Nursing Nipples

    Many mothers experience cracked, dry nipples while nursing their child. Instead of using lanolin many mothers are keeping a jar of coconut oil handy to use instead.

    9. Help Speeds Up Metabolism and Weight Loss

    Coconut oil is made up of medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) also known as medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). It is a healthy fat. When consumed, it goes directly to the liver and increases metabolism. This in turn leads to weight loss. Start adding a few tablespoons a day of coconut oil into your coffee or your favorite dishes to speed up weight loss.

    10. Body Scrub

    Mix equal parts coconut oil and sugar together for an instant skin exfoliator and moisturizer. Use in the bath or shower and have amazingly soft skin.

    Pick up your jar of coconut oil today at your local grocery store and start seeing the difference in your life.

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