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Tag Archives: growing up

  • 8 Amazing Perks of Being a Parent

    Amazing Perks of Being a Parent Even with all the chaos that comes with being a parent, the silver lining makes it all worth it. The reward for being someone’s mommy or daddy is unmatched. Here are 8 things that make being a parent one of the most awesome titles you will ever have.

    1. Knowing that your baby trusts you with his life

    When you gaze into your baby’s eyes, you know that they undoubtedly trust you more than any other person has before. Not only is this gaze adorable, it’s an honor.

    2. Dressing up your baby

    We know children are not dolls, and they will quickly develop their own personal style; but that small window where we get to dress our babies in whatever we like is just fun! The clothing available for babies and toddlers is absolutely adorable and sometimes witty. Since it’s pretty much not socially acceptable for us to wear a monkey suit to the grocery store, why not live vicariously through your 8-month-old.

    3. Understanding their babble

    For a good while, you’ll be the only person in the world that understands their baby’s language. You’ll act as an interpreter for other family members and friends. It’s almost surprising to you that grandpa doesn’t know “gummy boggle” means “I want my bottle now.” This secret language between you two is certainly a great way to feel connected.

    4. Being called “mom” or “dad”

    When you consider the meaning of such noble titles, hearing someone call you “mom” or “dad” is wonderfully empowering. It’s a reminder that you made a human life.

    5. Passing the torch

    Your child will of course become their own person and develop different passions. It’s still great when you see certain qualities and interests that you have manifest in someone else. Your child is your own little contribution to the world and a reflection of you.

    6. Being needed

    Knowing someone relies on you and literally NEEDS you can be a challenge, but it s also one of the GREATEST rewards in life. A sense of fulfillment comes from knowing your child wants and needs your help, insight, love and guidance. For some people, this is one of the few times in life they will feel valued. Being needed gives you a sense of unparalleled responsibility.

    7. Seeing the world through their perspective

    So many parents say having a child opened their mind to other world views they hadn’t even thought of before. When your child starts to make bold statements and ask pressing questions about relationships, death, and even politics we are forced to examine at the world a little differently.

    8. Love, Love, Love

    For many, the love between a parent and child is the only true unconditional love we will experience. Nothing compares.

    This list only scratches the surface! Tell us what your favorite part of being a parent is on our Facebook page.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 4 Things That Occur When Kids Don’t Get Enough Sleep

    When Kids Don’t Get Enough SleepGetting proper rest and recovery from sleep is important at any age, but even more so when kids are growing and developing. Sleep deprivation in kids can cause many detrimental consequences that will not only affect their day-to-day life, but also their future. Here are a few things that occur when kids don’t get enough sleep:

    1. Self-Regulation Issues

    A lack of sleep can cause a child to lose their ability to control themselves, which affects their emotions and moods. Studies have actually shown a link between short sleep duration, late bedtimes, and poor overall sleep quality with aggression, impulsivity, and being short-tempered. Also, kids who aren’t getting the amount of sleep they need can also show symptoms similar to children with ADHD; these symptoms include inability to sit still, stay on task, and focus.

    2. Lack of Growth/Development 

    When a child doesn’t get the necessary amount of sleep their body needs, it could negatively affect their growth and development. Getting enough sleep guarantees that our bodies are producing the right amount of hormones and chemicals at the right times to keep growing. Also, being well-rested allows a child the ability to pay attention, acquire and comprehend new information, and think critically. Without these abilities, kids won’t have access to the mental faculties they need to learn the basic skills they need.

    3. Health Problems 

    If your child fails to get the proper amount of sleep, their immune system and white blood cell production can suffer. When the immune system isn’t running at its optimal efficiency, children are much more susceptible to getting sick. Another health issue that can come from sleep deprivation occurs mentally. Research has shown a link between persistent sleep difficulties in childhood and mental health problems like depression, anxiety disorders, and alcohol abuse later in life. If all of these health problems can be avoided with some extra sleep, this is an important aspect to keep in mind with your children.

    4. Memory Loss

    It may be subtle, but when a child lacks the proper amount of sleep they need, their ability to retain information and memories can suffer. You probably know that on the days when you are most tired, you're forgetful and unfocused, but sleep deprivation can lead to permanent cognitive issues. The less we sleep, the less we benefit from the memory-storing properties of sleep. Additionally, a lack of sleep can cause "brain deterioration," according to a 2013 study, which may at least in part explain memory loss in seniors.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 5 Tips for Starting to Potty Train

    Tips for Starting to Potty TrainPotty training is never easy for parents or children. Some kids even become afraid of using the potty and outright refuse to use it. However, it’s an inevitable part of growing up, so every parent needs some tips to get started when the time comes. Here are some steps to try.

    The Introduction

    Slowly introducing the potty to your child’s life is a great first step on the road to potty training. A subtle introduction is helpful at first, especially if you have a feeling that your child may have fears of the toilet. Try reading children’s books on the subject, or including your child in the process of choosing a starter potty to begin the process.

    Equipment

    Choosing the perfect potty for your child is another initial step to begin potty training. Whether you end up buying a full potty that sits on the floor, or a potty seat that goes on top of a toilet, make sure to involve your child in the process. Let them decide which they would feel more comfortable using. Also, if you choose the potty seat, make sure to provide them with a step stool so they have a place to rest their feet for more comfort.

    Encouragement

    Encouraging your child along the way is necessary during the potty training process. Offer plenty of praise when they do something right, and be understanding if a mistake is made. Try to make them feel better about the process by offering a story of your own (whether you remember or not), describing the troubles you had as a child.

    Signs of Interest

    Since you certainly don’t want to rush your child into doing something they’re nervous or fearful of, you should wait to see some signs of interest in the potty. Signs of readiness to start learning include: general interest in how the potty works, uncomfortable in dirty diapers, talks about or brings up the potty, has begun dressing himself, and/or has some regularity to their bathroom schedule.

    Make it a Habit

    Ritualizing the process of using a potty is important to getting your child into a good habit. You can try having your child sit on the potty every couple hours or so, at specific times of the day. Make time for this habit of sitting on the potty, and try to make it fun for him/her by reading a book or playing a game!

    eco-friendly and non-toxic baby bottlesGuest Blog by Christine Barlow, Inventor of 5 Phases Eco-Friendly Baby Bottle System

    Mom Christine Barlow is the inventor of 5 Phases eco-friendly and non-toxic baby bottles, the safest and healthiest way to bottle feed your baby. Her inspiration in creating an alternative to traditional feeding bottles came after the birth of her 1lb 7oz micro-preemie baby. Having a compromised child, she became aware how environmental factors were affecting our children. With all the concerns of plastics and infants being the most vulnerable, she felt there was a need for more options for parents who wanted to use glass. She knew she had to act – and the 5 Phases Hybrid Glass Baby Bottles were born.

    5 Phases is dedicated to helping families achieve a healthier and organic lifestyle. Starting with baby, they develop products keeping both the environment and health of your family in mind. And when it comes to your baby nothing else will do – Christine knows, she’s a mom too!

    For more information on 5 Phases, visit www.5phases.com!

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • How Light is Keeping Your Baby Awake and 4 Ways to Stop It

    nightlight keeping baby awakeIn order to provide safe and effective sleep for our kids, we have to optimize their sleep environment. That means making their sleep space as comfortable and non-disruptive as possible. Just like adults, too much light keeps children awake, but you’ll also be surprised to know that the color of the light is also important.

    The light-dark cycle we’re exposed to every day is how we regulate our sleep cycle (or circadian rhythm) and even some of the hormones in our body. However, we often put night lights in our children’s rooms to make them feel safe, but they can cause more harm than good.

    Even if our kids (or adults) fall asleep in a room with gentle light, the brain can detect that light through the eyelids. This could inhibit the production of melatonin, a hormone that helps control our sleep-wake cycles. Typically melatonin is high in the late evening and throughout the night, then begins to decrease towards the morning. Essentially, it keeps you asleep.

    Blue, white and green spectrum light are both melatonin-suppressive. They stop your body from making melatonin, which eventually cause us to rise. This is the type of light emitted from electronic devices and most household lightbulbs.

    From a Harvard study: “While light of any kind can suppress the secretion of melatonin, blue light does so more powerfully. Harvard researchers and their colleagues conducted an experiment comparing the effects of 6.5 hours of exposure to blue light to exposure to green light of comparable brightness. The blue light suppressed melatonin for about twice as long as the green light and shifted circadian rhythms by twice as much (3 hours vs. 1.5 hours).”

    What’s even worse: some research shows that blue light may contribute to cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.

    Here are some ways you can make the sleep space as conducive to sleep as possible:

    1. Nix the nightlights

    The change might be tough to make, especially if your children are used to sleeping with nightlights, but their health is worth it. A simple and effective way to remove nightlights is to move them out of the room over time. Move them from their usual position to an outlet near the door, then an outlet in the hallway, down the hallway, etc. Eventually you’ll be able to do away with them without incident.

    2. Turn off electronic devices

    Make sure all televisions and computers are switched off during the night. Studies have shown that those children who watched TV and played video games before going to bed took longer to fall asleep than those who watched none at all. Even the light from alarm clocks can interfere with their sleep. (Most people don’t have an alarm clock in the nursery, but it’s worth mentioning since these sleep tips apply to anyone at any age.)

    3. Use red tone lights

    You’ll need light in some places, like the hallway or bathroom for when kids wake up. Use lights that work on the red spectrum so they don’t disrupt sleep. Here are three great options: the Himalayan Salt Lamp, the Ikea Patrull Nightlight and the OriGlam Light Color Change Humidifier.

    4. Install blackout curtains

    Blackout curtains are a great way to keep outside light out of the room. These don’t just stop the sunlight. They also stop car headlights, street lamps, moonlight and other weather related light from penetrating the room and keeping your little one awake. They also reduce your heating and cooling costs.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 7 Tips for Giving New Baby a Lovey

    giving baby a lovey(PLEASE NOTE: The AAP does not recommend using a soft toy or blanket in the crib before the child is one year of age. Once your baby is 12 months, it's okay for your child to bring a blanket or special toy to bed for comfort, but it's still safest to keep his crib relatively empty.)

    A lovey is also known as a transitional object. Your child goes through a lot of changings during the first year; many of them are stressful. A transitional object is a loveable item that never changes. It stays with the child through his or her changes and provides security. It’s helpful for sleep because it’s always there when your child is alone in bed or wakes up during the night.

    A lovey can be a blanket, stuffed animal or favorite toy. It can be anything as long as your child forms a bond with it. If you don’t intentionally introduce a lovely, there’s a pretty good chance your child will develop a connection with something anyway. Here’s how you can introduce one.

    1. Consider baby’s preferences

    You want an item that your child can easily relate to without much insistence on your part. If your child likes throw blankets, offer a special one. If your child has an affinity for rabbits, a stuffed bunny might be the best transitional object. You could also try a stuffed character from one of baby’s favorite books or programs.

    2. Introduce it early

    Make the lovey part of your child’s life around three to six months of age. Baby won’t respond to it right away, but the connection will slowly build over time. By eight months, your child will feel like it’s always been around, which cements consistency.

    3. Make sure the lovely is safe

    Ideally you want something soft and comfy so you don’t have to monitor your child’s use all the time. It should be able to remain in bed with your child all night. It should not have small pieces that can separate or be removed. It should not have any hard edges.

    4. Make it part of the bedtime routine

    The best way to get your child to accept a lovey is to make it a part of everyday life. Bring it to bed at bedtime. Incorporate it into games and play. Kiss and hug the lovey so your child sees that you accept it and that it’s safe.

    5. Make sure the lovey is present during stressful times

    If you think an occurrence or event will cause stress, make sure the lovey is around. You’ll want it present during doctor’s visits, waking periods after sleep, injuries, meeting new people, and crowded events.

    6. Impart mommy or daddy’s smell

    Young children use their sense of smell for comfort. You can make the lovey feel like mom or dad by snuggling with the lovey yourself. Make sure it touches you when you cuddle with your child before bed. You could also wear it for a few hours against your skin before you give it to your child.

    7. Choose something replaceable

    The idea of a transitional object is that it always stays with your baby, so you’ll want something you can replace in the event that it becomes lost, damaged or destroyed. If you’re buying something new and the cost isn’t too high, consider picking up a spare.

    transition baby from swaddleGuest Blog by Stephanie Parker from Sleepingbaby.com, inventor of the Zipadee-Zip

    The motto for Sleeping Baby, makers of the Zipadee-Zip, is: "Inspiring Dreams One Night at A time," and that, in a nutshell, is how it all started…with one little dream that has since become the Parker family's reality. When Brett and Stephanie Parker's daughter, Charlotte, was born, the feeling that welled up inside of them was indescribable; they never realized until first looking into those baby blues of hers that they were even capable of that kind of love.

    When it was time to transition baby from swaddling, the Parkers tried every sleep sack on the market and every swaddle weaning trick they could find for nearly two weeks and nothing worked to get baby Charlotte to fall and stay asleep.

    Stephanie became determined to restore sleep and sanity to their household and set out to find a solution that would soothe Charlotte's startle reflex and provide her the cozy womb-like environment she loved so much but still give her the freedom to roll over and wiggle around in her crib safely. Out of sheer desperation and exhaustion, the Zipadee-Zip was born. The first Zipadee-Zip(R) Stephanie put together on her little sewing machine worked like magic!

    To date tens of thousands of Zipadee-Zips have been sold and all from word-of-mouth marketing. It is so rewarding for the Parkers to see other parents and babies getting the sleep they both need and deserve!

    For more information, visit sleepingbaby.com.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 5 Tips to Teach Your Children How to Share

    Teach Your Children How to ShareLearning to share is a normal part of growing up. Kids aren’t built to know how to do this themselves. Parents need to encourage their children to share until the kids start picking it up on their own. This will help turn your children into compassionate, empathetic adults who work well with others. Here are some tips.

    1. Teach taking turns

    If you have two children who want to play with the same item, teach them that they can share by taking turns. You can tell them that they each have 10 minutes to play with the toy and then set a timer. Once the timer goes off it’s the other child’s turn to play with the toy. Not only are they learning how to share, they are also learning patience and delaying gratification. If the children cannot agree to take turns, take the toy away and tell them that neither can play with the toy until they can learn to share.

    2. Set some basic rules

    A young child may not fully understand the concept of sharing right away, but they can follow basic rules that will help them learn how to share. These rules can include teaching them to wait their turn and that if they walk away from a toy, that means it’s free for another child to play with it. Also teach them that if they brings toys along to a play date, everyone gets to play with those toys too.

    3. Donate old toys

    When your children have too many toys in their playroom or get news ones for their birthday or other holidays, donate some to a charity or children’s shelter.  Talk to your child and explain what it means to donate toys and why it’s a good idea to share with the less fortunate. You can even bring your child to a toy store and ask them to pick out items to donate.

    4. Let them see you share.

    Children look to their parents and often emulate their actions and behaviors. Share things with your child, like a cookie or ice cream and ask him to share things with you. If your child is cold, share a blanket with him, and offer the same to other members of your family. Let them know that you would love to share some of your ice cream with them and describe your sharing interactions to them.

    5. Make it fun

    Give your child small toys and rewards to share with some friends. It could be a sheet of stickers or some snacks to be divided evenly with each of his friends. Give your child positive reinforcement by saying how nice it is of him to share with friends and how his friends must feel happy to have a friend who likes to share.

    winter hat, gloves and scarf for babies and toddlersGuest Blog by Christina Plejdrup, Mom and Inventor of the Minkey

    Christina Plejdrup is a mother of a 3-year-old girl, Oliva, who tried many different winter products to see if she could find anything that could get her daughter to keep her gloves on as well as her hat and scarf. Christina tried everything, but nothing worked!

    After several failed attempts to get her daughter to keep her gloves, hat and scar on, Christina designed her own solution! It worked like a charm and when they would walk through their neighborhood, several parents asked where they found such a unique and practical winter garment.  This is when the Minkey (as her daughter calls it) was born.

    The Minkey is a unique 3-in-1 winter hat, gloves and scarf for babies and toddlers. It’s easy to use and goes great under any jacket, snowsuit or vest, and children have plenty of comfort and movement. They will always stay warm and dry where it is important while out in the cold.

    The Minkey is now an award-winning product adored by parents and kids all over the globe!  Visit http://www.theolie.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • Why Sleep is Important for Babies and Kids

    Why Sleep is Important for Babies and KidsEveryone knows sleep is important. After a long day, your body craves sleep whether you mentally want to or not. In fact, go long enough without it and our bodies would fall asleep on their own.

    For children, though, sleep plays an interesting role in their development. It doesn’t just rejuvenate them for another day like you or I. Sleep plays a key role in their growth.

    In our bodies, the pituitary gland secrets the Human Growth Hormone, a substance that, quite literally, helps the body grow. Its production is influenced by many factors, such as stress, nutrition and exercise. In growing bodies, however, HGH is affected by sleep.

    HGH is most intensely released shortly after children fall into their deep sleep. That means they do the most growing while they are asleep.

    That means without proper sleep, a child’s growth can actually be stunted. Improper sleep can consist of keeping a child awake when their bodies want to sleep, or a sleep obstruction problem like sleep apnea.

    If a child severely lacks HGH, they can even suffer from lung and heart problems, as these organs may not grow fast enough to keep up with their bodies. It’s unlikely that a lack of sleep could cause this much damage, but little sleep combined with an underlying condition could create a serious problem.

    Other hormones can be affected by a lack of sleep as well. Hormones that regulate appetite can be affected, causing your child to overeat or prefer high-calorie foods. Lack of sleep can affect the way a child’s body handles the food it receives by triggering insulin resistance (which is a threat for diabetes).

    You can tell your child needs more sleep by evaluating their mood and behavior. If they’re frequently cranky, irritable and lethargic, they might need a few more hours at night or an extra nap during the day. Lack of sleep over a long term can affect your child’s grades in school, their performance in extra-curricular activities, and even make permanent changes to their disposition and personality.

    Ensure your child is getting enough sleep by setting a bedtime and nap routine appropriate for their age and adjusting it as you see fit. A consistent routine will help their bodies adjust so they know when sleep is coming. Make sure your child’s sleeping space is conducive to sleep without any distractions.

    Most importantly, keep an eye out for signs of sleep deprivation. It does more damage than you think.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • Managing Separation Anxiety

    Managing Separation AnxietyBabies under six months old get by just fine without mom and dad for a night or two, but by seven or eight months, they have learned object permanence. Object permanence is the concept that things and people exist even when they are out of our sight. Baby knows you’re somewhere, so he feels stressed because you aren’t with him. If your baby fusses and struggles when you leave, here are some tips on dealing with his separation anxiety.

    1. Create a good-bye ritual.

    Create a simple ritual that you perform every time you leave for the day. Make it something memorable. You could sing a short rhyme, give hugs and kisses, and then leave. Do not return. If you return because you see or hear your child crying, you’ll just make it harder in the long run.

    2. Practice leaving.

    Games like peek-a-boo help and “Where’s Mommy?’ give your child some separation practice. Practice leaving for short periods of time by going into the other room while another caregiver watches baby. Perform your good-bye ritual and step into your bedroom for a few moments.

    3. Socialize with the sitter.

    Ideally, your regular daycare provider would be someone you interact with often, like a grandparent or close friend. You want baby to be close with this person so he doesn’t feel alone when you leave. If you’ll be putting your child in daycare, opt to spend a few hours at the facility with baby so he spends time with the care providers.

    4. Provide a consistent pattern.

    Kids thrive on predictability. If you usually drop your child off to daycare in the morning, continue this routine even on days where you don’t work as early.

    5. Offer a sense of control.

    Ask your child if he wants to play with the blocks or the coloring books when he gets to daycare. It doesn’t matter what he answers, but by choosing something, he has gained an element of control over his day and won’t feel powerless.

    6. Keep calm yourself.

    If your child sees you struggling with the separation, he isn’t going to handle it well himself. Keep your emotions in check and stay positive.

    7. Meet all of your child’s needs before leaving.

    Separations are harder when your child is hungry, sick, tired or needs a change. Solve all of these problems beforehand and leave when your baby is usually happy and alert (typically mornings).

    8. Send some favorite items.

    If the separation is taking place outside the home, pack along some favorite items that make baby comfortable.

    pacifier holderGuest Blog by Julie Tabor Thompson, Founder & President of Bounce Innovations, Inventor of PullyPalz

    As a mother of two, Julie found she was continuously retrieving dropped pacifiers, because even though they spit them out, they still want them immediately! She called it "the pacifier game," and, at times, it was difficult to play. One day, she thought, 'I wish somebody would invent a ...' A what? What could make it so babies can keep up with their pacifiers? Clips help parents keep up with pacifiers, but they don't help the baby. Babies don't understand when it's behind their shoulder or around their side. As they say, out of sight, out of mind. She started by making the first prototype in her kitchen (which included melting molding plastic, an instruction manual for her sewing machine, and YouTube videos). Several designs later, the PullyPalz were born... The first ever pacifier toy that - with the help of baby's interaction - keeps pacis coming back!

    Her goal is to offer unique products that make life and parenthood just a little easier, and ultimately more enjoyable. Compatible products (teethers and toys) will be coming to market soon. Julie also offers product development and consultation services for other aspiring entrepreneurs.

    For more information, visit www.pullypalz.com.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • How to Develop a Sleep Schedule for Baby

    develop a sleep schedule for babyIf you can establish a successful sleep schedule for your child, it can make your life a whole lot easier. Also, a sleep schedule will put your baby on track for a much healthier lifestyle as they grow older. Try to use the following guidelines to get started but the key to developing a sleep schedule is using the techniques that work best for you.

    (Keep in mind that there’s no need to usher your child toward a sleep schedule during the first three months. For health reasons, it’s best to allow your baby to sleep whenever he or she prefers.)

    Start Early

    If possible, try to start a sleep schedule as soon as your child is able to fulfill the guidelines you’re putting in place. Once a consistent bedtime is established, the rest of the day will fall into place a lot easier.

    Establish a Routine

    One of the best ways to signal to your child that it’s almost time to go to sleep is by initiating the established routine you have set for them. Whether this routine includes brushing their teeth, taking a bath, putting on pajamas, reading a story, or other ideas, practicing this habitual schedule will slowly get them ready for bedtime. By the time all the pre-bedtime tasks are completed, your child’s body will know it’s time for the lights to be turned off.

    Night and Day

    When a child is very young, they sometimes get their nights and days mixed up due to all the occasional naps and weird sleep schedules they develop. When it’s daytime, try to keep the house bright and active so there’s no chance of them confusing it for bedtime. Play active games and speak to baby often.

    At night, the house should be dim or dark and there shouldn’t be any noises or loud conversations. Speak soothingly and play quietly. They need to know that night is for sleeping and day is for everything else!

    Make the Sacrifice

    When you’re first starting out on establishing your child’s sleep routine, there may be times when you have to make a sacrifice of staying up very late or waking up very early. Also, try to observe their patterns throughout the first few weeks to see which times of the day and night they’re most active or docile. Once a sleep schedule is in place, make sure that vacations, long events, and outings, etc. don’t make you deviate from it at all. The smallest interference could have a big impact on a young child.

    Expect Changes

    As your baby grows, you’ll have to change and adapt the sleep schedule to meet his changing needs. Baby will need fewer naps and more daytime stimulation, but sleep longer stretches at night. Embrace these changes as a sign that your little one is growing up.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • Your Baby’s Sleep Development

    baby sleep development guideDuring the first year of your baby’s life, you’ll be privileged to witness a myriad of changes and developmental achievements. You’ll witness his sleep schedule change to meet the demands of his growing body. Here’s a summary of your baby’s sleep development by age and what to expect.

    Birth to Three Months

    During this period your baby will sleep a lot, up to 18 hours per day. However, he’ll only sleep for three or four hours at a time in between feedings. Tame the sleepless nights using a safe swaddle for baby.

    Your baby’s sleep cycle is far shorter than ours, including more time in the easily-disturbed phases. This type of rest is critical for proper brain development.

    You can help your baby sleep during this time by recognizing when he’s tired. After two hours of wakefulness, he’ll need sleep. Don’t let him become overtired or he’ll struggle to slumber. Learn the sleepy cues: he’s sleepy if he rubs his eyes, swats at his ears, whines at the slightest stimuli, becomes quiet and still, yawns a lot, or loses interest in people and toys. He’ll also probably push his face into your chest or skin to block out stimulations.

    You can help him begin to recognize day time versus night time by being especially active during the day (socializing, playing, talking, keeping the house bright) and relaxed and calm in the evenings.

    Three Months to Six Months

    At this point your baby will still sleep 15 hours per day, but a long stretch of that will take place at night. The rest is likely divided amongst a few daytime napes. By six months he should be capable of sleeping throughout the night without interruption (even without a feeding).

    Make sure to set clearly established bedtimes and naptimes. Earlier, determining when to sleep was as simple was watching for the signs. Now you have to take a bit of control. He’ll need consistency to regulate his sleep patterns.

    You should also be developing a bedtime routine that you’ll follow each evening. Some popular bedtime routine activities include a quiet game, a warm bath, a bedtime story, lullaby, and a gentle massage. Using a product like the Slumber Sleeper™ - a 4-in-1 mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet, and sleep sack - every night will allow baby that consistency and familiarity they associate with sleep time. Use whatever routine works for you, but stay consistent.

    Six to Nine Months

    By this time your baby should be sleeping up to seven to 11 hours per night. He’s probably waking briefly during the night, but he has learned how to soothe himself back to sleep. That’s a great sign!

    Continue to keep consistent times with the morning and afternoon naps. Continue to follow your bedtime routine. It’s important at this point to introduce as much stability as you can into your baby’s schedule. That includes lunches, snacks, and bouts of activity during the day. Regular activities will help your baby fall asleep more easily when it’s time.

    At this age, your baby might be waking up at night due to the teething or separation anxiety. He may also wake up and begin experimenting with his new skills: siting up, rolling over, and crawling. After a bit of movement, he might find it tough to settle back down. If he calls for you, pause before rushing into the room. He may figure out how to fall asleep himself.

    Nine to Twelve Months

    Sleep is still crucial to his development. At this point your baby is still sleeping 10 to 11 hours at night with two shorter naps during the day. Maintain his consistent daytime and bedtime schedules. He should be well in sync by now.

    You may hear your baby standing up in the crib, cruising back and forth and even shouting for you at night. He’s begun to become aware that you still exist when you aren’t around, and the separation makes him anxious. It’s up to you if you go into the room at night, but remember to give him plenty of opportunities to fall asleep on his own. With the Slumber Sleeper™, baby is more likely to go back to sleep alone sooner and parents have peace of mind that baby is safe in crib.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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