Call Us! 855.777.4338

Helping Children (and Families)
to Have a Better Night's Sleep

Tag Archives: doctor

  • Is My Baby Sleeping Too Much?

    Is My Baby Sleeping Too MuchSleep is a tough subject to relate to most parents. Children are all different. Some need more, some need less. Most of the time, parents are concerned that their children aren’t sleeping enough, but sometimes parents wonder if their child sleeps too much.

    Newborns sleep a LOT

    The first two to three months of your baby’s life is full of rapid growth, which is exhausting. They’ll spend most of their non-eating time asleep. If your baby seems perpetually lethargic during this period, everything is normal.

    Some parents have to gently wake their children with a breast or bottle every 2-3 hours during the first couple weeks to make sure they eat, but otherwise babies will wake up when they’re hungry. The best measure of development at this stage is if your child is wetting at least eight diapers a day. If your child is not producing enough wet or dirty diapers, speak with your doctor.

    What about after the newborn stage?

    Around three months, a good day of sleep is about 15 hours. If it’s a couple more than 15, that’s OK too. That typically breaks down to 11-12 at night and three or more hours during the day.

    Awake time is important too, however. Children need time to soak in their surroundings, interact with loved ones and explore their world. If your child is sleeping more than 18 hours in a day, there might be an underlying medical condition at play. Consult with your doctor.

    What about the toddler stage?

    As your baby gets older, his/her sleep needs will lessen and consolidate to a long afternoon nap. Instead of three one-hour naps, you’ll drop down to two, then one long one. So if your two year old falls asleep for three hours after lunch, nothing is actually wrong. It’s just his/her body becoming better at sleeping and managing to stay down.

    Mind your own instincts

    A parent’s instincts are the best tool to gauge something like this. Do you feel your child is missing out on learning because he/she is sleeping? Do they want to go back to sleep soon after waking? Do you feel like your child isn’t hitting milestones because he/she hasn’t had enough wake time to practice? (Keep in mind that every child is different; there’s no date a child should hold a spoon, sit up, walk, etc.)

    One other thing: be grateful if you have a baby that sleeps easily. Many parents envy you!

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • 11 Things to Consider When Choosing Your Child’s Pediatrician

    Choosing Your Child’s PediatricianChoosing a pediatrician for your new baby is an intensely personal decision. You want to find the right doctor that you can stick with through the years so your child becomes comfortable. Here are some things you ought to consider as you make your decision.

    1. Is the doctor accredited? This is usually a simple check that’s worth 10 seconds of your time. Is the doctor licensed? Where did he go to school?

    2. What are his office hours? Obviously you need someone who holds office hours that work for your schedule. If you work 9-6 and your so does your doctor, you’ll constantly be rescheduling your life to make an appointment.

    3. What is the staff’s demeanor? Your child will be interacting with the doctor and his staff (administrators and nurses). You want these people to be calm and kind to alleviate fear.

    4. Can you make phone calls? Are they returned timely? Oddly, some offices don’t take phone calls. They force you to make an appointment. But you’ll want the flexibility to be able to ask the doctor or a nurse a quick question.

    5. Does your doctor have any hospital appointments? If your child is hospitalized, will your doctor play a role in the care or will you have to find a new doctor with hospital access?

    6. What are the other physicians like? Many doctors practice in a group. If you need care on your doctor’s day off, you’ll end up with another doctor, so make sure they are acceptable substitutes.

    7. Does the doctor coordinate specialists? If your child develops a complex illness, will your doctor work with the other specialists or push you onto a different pediatrician to handle the load?

    8. Does the doctor speak in plain English? You want a doctor who will skip the medical jargon and tell you straight what’s going on with your child. Does he throw big terms at you (that you can’t possibly know) or speak plainly?

    9. Does the doctor care? Or is he just trying to cram as many patients (and billings) into the same day as possible?

    10. What are the doctor’s values? Some people have some specific requirements in a doctor for spiritual/personal/religious reasons. Your doctor doesn’t have to agree with those requirements, but be willing to provide care that fits in line with them.

    11. What is his reputation? To answer this question, you’ll have to ask around. Ask people you know what they have heard about the practice. Get some testimonials from current or previous patients about their experiences.

    safe sleep solutionWritten by Joanna von Yurt, Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Co-Founder and CEO of Swanling Innovations Inc.

    Joanna von Yurt is the mother of three intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate girls (who all want to be mommies when they grow up). She is first AND foremost a mom! Professionally, however, she is an accountant, controller and serial entrepreneur.

    Joanna has a degree in Psychology from Harvard University with an emphasis in child psychology. She worked as an infant caregiver for 12 years and interned as a Child Life Specialist, family/social therapist, and assisted in clinical studies involving children’s personality and social psychology. Joanna is a Certified Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) Prevention Professionals, Safe Sleep Educator, Member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants, Member of the National Sleep Foundation, and Member of the Canadian Sleep Society.

    Joanna has a lifelong passion for childcare and child safety. She enjoys sharing her experiences with other parents about sleep routines, attachment parenting, safe sleep guidelines, and children’s natural sleep patterns. Her company, Swanling Innovations, is committed to producing modern, safe and innovative products that meet the expectations of discerning parents. The Slumber Sleeper™ is a 4-in 1 safe sleep solution (mattress protector, flat sheet, fitted sheet and sleep sack all in one) designed to help keep your baby safe, warm and centered.

    Joanna always says that a well-rested child and well-rested parents add up to a happy family!

    Visit www.swanling.com for more information.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

  • How to Prepare to Welcome Home a New Baby

    how to prepare for a babyBabies are exciting and wonderful, but they sure can shake our lives up! For the first few months, you’ll do nothing by eat, sleep (a little), work, and care for your new child. Before you go into this endeavor, it’s important to be prepared. Here are some ways you can prepare for your new baby.

    Prepare your other children for the new addition.

    If you have other children, you’ll need to take steps to make sure that they understand what will be happening soon. Your older children may understand what a brother or sister is on a general level, but you’ll need to explain to them how everyone’s life will change, especially during the first year. Make sure it’s clear that you won’t be favoring the new baby and that you will need their big sister or big brother “help.”

    Enlist some help for the first few weeks postpartum.

    The first month or so after birth is often the hardest on parents. Your sleep schedule is off, there’s a lot of crying that rubs your nerves, and you still aren’t sure you’re doing everything properly. Even if both parents are together, don’t be afraid to enlist some help from a family member or friend, even if you only need them to wash a load of laundry or cook dinner. You’ll be surprised how many people are willing to help.

    Learn how to install your car seat.

    A car seat is an important safety tool that you absolutely need if you plan to take your baby in a car. They need to be installed and used properly to ensure your baby is safe. Take some time before your baby is born to understand how this device works. If you aren’t sure, stop by a car seat technician in your area (usually at your local police station).

    Find a doctor that you like.

    The best time to interview doctors is before your child is born. After the birth you’ll be a lot busier than you expect and sitting down with pediatricians just won’t make your schedule. Set up a few short interviews with a few doctors in your area to get a feel about their practice. Make sure to bring up any value issues you may have.

    Understand the birthing process.

    Men and women who take the time to learn about the birthing process are more likely to be active participants, which creates better outcomes. For example, a mother who learns about the impact of diet and stress on her pregnancy is more likely to make better choices for her and her baby’s health. Learn as much as you can.

    Talk to veteran moms.

    The best source of information you have are the people in your life who have been through it all before. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. You may feel like asking “How do I change a diaper?” will receive laughs, but it’s an honest question that you need answered. Don’t be afraid to ask.

    Don’t buy anything until after your baby shower.

    If you’re fortunate to have a family, wait until the gift-giving festivities have ended before you start making your own purchases. A new baby makes people especially generous. Your family may supply you with most of the things you need.

    Build a savings.

    Babies aren’t tremendously expensive, but they can put a strain on any budget that doesn’t prepare for them. Add to your monthly budget any expenses you could think of (including doctors’ co-pays, which add up) to get an idea of how much you need to budget and save for.

    booger removal toolGuest Blog by Dr. Nina Farzin, Inventor of oogiebear

    Nina is a wife, mother and career professional who never intended to start her own business. When her children were newborns, she ached to ease the discomfort from dry, stubborn, crusty mucus (boogers)! As a doctor, she knew there were no safe solutions on the market to help her kids, so she invented oogiebear, a revolutionary booger removal tool that helps babies breathe easier.

    Nina graduated Howard University where she earned her doctorate in Pharmacy (R.Ph, Pharm.D). She is a Registered Pharmacist in Washington DC, Maryland and New York. Nina and her family are fitness enthusiasts who enjoy outdoor activities and healthy eating.

    For more information, please visit myoogie.com.

    Interested in writing a guest blog for Swanling? Send your topic idea to pr@swanling.com.

    All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Swanling makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

3 Item(s)

Questions?   Need Help?